Workforce engagement

  • Category:
    Business
  • Document type:
    Essay
  • Level:
    Masters
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    1861

8Communication

COMMUNICATION: ENGAGEMENT OF THE WORKFORCE

Table of Contents

3Introduction

3Centrality of Communication

4Developing Communication Skills

4The Art of Listening

5Conclusion

5References and Relevance

8References

Introduction

The workforce has always been the basis for the success or failure of organizations (Black, Akintoye & Fitzgerald, 2000, p. 424). The degree of passion for one’s job determines the passion that one has for the organization. To have a committed workforce, the leaders and the workers need to have a solid and productive relationship. In a world that is rapidly embracing the online platforms of interaction, communication has stemmed as a crucial pillar to the success of any entity. Today, communication between an organization and the outside world can even take place without the necessary marketing (Black et al., 2000, p.427). This is especially possible since employees can relay so much information to customers, without speaking it; showing how communication is as much verbal as it is non-verbal. Additionally, managerial heads have the responsibility of upholding the reputation of business entities or organizations (Marchington & Wilkinson, 2006, p.66). Checking the various avenues of communication and assessing the most effective ones could determine the success or lack thereof of any firm. Furthermore, since the workforce is the true reflection of the organization, having a passionate workforce spells out the mission of the organization, and is key in expansion and development of any entity (Walsham, 2001, p.601). This review, therefore, briefly discusses communication as a central factor in the engagement of the workforce.

Body

Centrality of Communication

This section will focus on the three elements of communication: speaking, acting and listening. Effective communicators, espoused in great speakers, employ these three factors.

  • Notable among the deaf and mute, speaking can be seen in one’s actions (Black et al., 2000, p. 424). They show how speaking can either be verbal or non-verbal.

  • Workers can pick a few features from their employers that need no verbal explanations. The same is true for the employers, who can monitor workers and tell volumes about specific workers (Cameron, 2000, p.7).

  • Of special note is the fact that the impact of the leaders often affects the workers. To have an adept speaker, a leader should inspire the best out of the workers. This introduces the third aspect of communication — listening. Leaders that have a listening ear for its workers is a significant step in addressing problems that are yet from surfacing (Cameron, 2000, p.7).

  • Workers are the ones that are closest to the common customer. They are, therefore, likely to pick up particular features about that they feel the organization may not be addressing. A keen ear from the managers may also inspire the same from the workers; they may get suggestions from the customers to better their service provision.

Developing Communication Skills

This segment will touch on developing the necessary communication skills.

  • The three elements of communication calls for use of skills in communication (Deb, 2006, p.218). How one speaks to an investor should be different from how one speaks to a potential job applicant (Marchington & Wilkinson, 2006, p.66). However, the same image should be seen from each of these two parties – that the managers have valuable communication skills (Deb, 2006, p.218).

  • Communication skills need to be evident as well among the workers. The supervisors can facilitate this by making sure that workers enrol in seminars and programmes aimed at improving one’s interpersonal skills (McIntosh, Luecke & Davis, 2008, p.2).

  • To the employers and supervisors, special training is also necessary (Koprowska, 2010, p.3). How one addresses those that work under him/her determines how best the work can be done, as well as the time-frame within which it can be achieved. Combined effort from both the employers and employee may further create a symbolic form of communication that preaches the mission of the organization to potential job-seekers.

  • The brand of the entity markets itself through proper communication executed by the managerial heads to the public and to potential investors (Deb, 2006, p.218). The workers do the same and foster loyalty among the common customer. This skill creates a standard for the firm that is evident to the public and a daily target for the organization.

The Art of Listening

In this segment, the main element of listening will be expounded on giving notes on the various consequences.

  • One’s intention for an employee may not be received as intended. How one listens to the message determines one’s output (Leonard, 2004, p.86). Taken positively, it is plausible that the resultant output may be positively affected. Negatively accepted comments may affect one’s esteem and harshly impact one’s productive efforts (Deb, 2006, p.218).

  • While speaking and acting from the employers is relevant, actively listening is equally important. It should come clear to the speaker that you are paying attention by responding appropriately. Response can either be immediate or prolonged, either of which can show that one got the intended message. Consistent follow-up is recommended to establish that the message is well received (Leonard, 2004, p.86).

  • On the other hand, the evolution of communication and the prejudiced stereotypic perspectives cloud how one interprets information. This aspect brings to the fore some of the challenges of communication that have a bearing to listening (Doak, Doak, Fischhoff, Brewer & Downs, 2011, p.2). Online platforms have a way of controlling institutions. Online monitoring has streamlined the performance of firms based on consumer comments and suggestions. It shows how firms listen to consumers and breeds loyalty among them. It also shows how listening has its own benefits both for the customers and the organization. Within the organization, a listening worker can get insights from customers (Shang & Seddon, 2000).

  • To ensure that companies have workers that listen to customers, managers and interpret messages appropriately, special programmes can be organized for the workforce. Certificate programmes, online classes, regular testing, peer-review programmes and seminars can create potential avenues of improving the necessary listening skills (Shang & Seddon, 2000).

Conclusion

In conclusion, in the past, as in the present, communication has proven to be a central issue that warrants constant attention and continued improvement. Key among these issues are:

  1. The centrality of communication

  2. Nurturing communication skills, and

  3. Learning the art of listening.

Furthermore, the advent of online platforms is just an indicator of the diverse ways in which communication can be exploited to ease the process of management. More importantly, ensuring that there is productive communication between the managers and the workforce nurtures the necessary conditions for progressive development at the individual and institutional level. Although briefly highlighted, the barriers that bar the establishment of this relationship need the consistent efforts from all parties involved. A regular assessment of efficient communication within an organization may be recommended.

References and Relevance

The set of references used elaborate wholesomely the effect of communication on the management, leadership and overall performance of any enterprise or organization. It further shows the significance of communication as a critical susses factor, hence their inclusion as reference material. Below are the cited references.

  1. Black, C., Akintoye, A. and Fitzgerald, E., 2000, An analysis of success factors and benefits of partnering in construction. International Journal of Project Management, vol.18, no. 6, pp.423-434. – Talks of the applicability of communication in management, especially in a medical setting.

  2. Cameron, D., 2000, Good to talk?: living and working in a communication culture, London [u.a.], SAGE. – Explains the association between social relations and communication. The way one communicates tells more about how he/she relates with people.

  3. Deb, T., 2006,Strategic approach to human resource management: concept, tools and application, New Delhi, Atlantic. Top of Form- Talks of how the management have a special role in maintaining the brand of the company. For this reason, their communication skills need to be good and maintained for the purposes of preserving the public image.

  4. Doak, L. G., Doak, C. C., Fischhoff, B., Brewer, N. T. and Downs, J. S., 2011, Communicating risks and benefits: an evidence-based user’s guide. – Elaborates the pros and cons of communication. It also explains how the pros can be exploited to one’s benefit and how the cons can be minimised or avoided.

  5. Koprowska, J., 2010, Communication and interpersonal skills in social work, Exeter, Learning Matters.Bottom of Form – Explains how communication can tell much about one’s interpersonal skills. It also gives insight into how one can improve their interpersonal skills.

  6. Leonard, M, 2004, The human factor: the critical importance of effective teamwork and communication in providing safe care, Quality and Safety in Health Care, vol. 13, no.1, pp.85-90. – Shows how teamwork and communication are dependent. It portrays the critical aspects of each of these two aspects and their work-place value.

  7. Marchington, M. and Wilkinson, A., 2006, Human resource management at work: people management and development, London, Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. – Explains how communication determines the kind of investors that a company attracts. It also determines the kind of applicants that they get. This is in relation to human resource department and its role in vetting the most suitable candidate.

  8. McIntosh, P., Luecke, R.and Davis, J. H., 2008, Interpersonal communication skills in the workplace, [New York], American Management Association. – Explains the relationship between colleagues at places of work. It also hints on the maintenance of good rapport between employees and employers for sustained worker engagement.

  9. Shang, S. and Seddon, P., 2000, A Comprehensive Framework for Classifying the Benefits of ERP Systems. Aisel.aisnet.org. Viewed 2 Aug. 2016: http://aisel.aisnet.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1452&context=amcis2000 . – Discusses the role of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) as a management tool for enterprises. It further discusses the critical role of communication in delegation, decentralization and allocation of duties. Furthermore, it explores the use of ERP systems as a simplified means of communication among the employers and between the employees and their supervisors.

  10. Walsham, G. 2001. Knowledge Management: European Management Journal, 19(6), pp.599-608. – Explains in detail giving several historical and hypothetical examples on the relevance of communication. It echoes the fact that communication is essential to the expansion of any given entity.

References

Black, C., Akintoye, A. and Fitzgerald, E., 2000, An analysis of success factors and benefits of partnering in construction. International Journal of Project Management, vol.18, no. 6, pp.423-434.

Cameron, D., 2000, Good to talk?: living and working in a communication culture, London [u.a.], SAGE.

Deb, T., 2006,Strategic approach to human resource management: concept, tools and application, New Delhi, Atlantic. Top of Form

Doak, L. G., Doak, C. C., Fischhoff, B., Brewer, N. T. and Downs, J. S., 2011, Communicating risks and benefits: an evidence-based user’s guide.

Koprowska, J., 2010, Communication and interpersonal skills in social work, Exeter, Learning Matters.Bottom of Form

Leonard, M, 2004, The human factor: the critical importance of effective teamwork and communication in providing safe care, Quality and Safety in Health Care, vol. 13, no.1, pp.85-90.

Marchington, M. and Wilkinson, A., 2006, Human resource management at work: people management and development, London, Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.

McIntosh, P., Luecke, R.and Davis, J. H., 2008, Interpersonal communication skills in the workplace, [New York], American Management Association.

Shang, S. and Seddon, P., 2000, A Comprehensive Framework for Classifying the Benefits of ERP Systems. Aisel.aisnet.org. Viewed 2 Aug. 2016: http://aisel.aisnet.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1452&context=amcis2000 .

Walsham, G. 2001. Knowledge Management: European Management Journal, 19(6), pp.599-608.