Why and how did Gandhi’s politics merge the traditional with the modern? Discuss with reference to the primary and secondary sources. Essay Example

Gandhi’s Politics

Introduction

In India Mahatma Gandhi’s politics has been an important aspect in the Indian society. He tried to merge the Indian Home rule with what was regarded as a foreign rule for the benefit of the Indian society. Violence was by no means a way of resistance of the foreign rule and language. The paper discusses the reasons and how Gandhi merged traditional Indian politics with the modern aspects.

Why and how did Gandhi’s politics merge the traditional with the modern?

According to Gandhi, in relation to the Indian Home Rule, he asserts that the home rule should not be a product of brutal force since violence is not a necessity for attaining the ultimate goal1. He argued that the mere expulsion of the English language as an aspect of foreign rule will not enable the attainment of home rule. He further asserts that British rule is indispensable and compares it with God terming that it is only God who is dispensable. Thus through the use of common sense the presence of English in India was a necessity2. Under the anarchy Home Rule should not be perceived as being better than an orderly foreign rule. Tyranny either under the English Rule or the Indian rule should not be allowed to set its foot in India. Thus if the idea of embracing English language and no use of violence means was executed by both the extremists and the moderates there should be no cause of distrust among the two groups in India. There should be sensitivity to both religions i.e. Christianity and Islam. Hence traditional politics was merged with the modern through the embrace of non violence means, adoption of English and foreign rule together with religion sensitivity in India (Gandhi, 215).

Young provides a variety of assessment of postcolonial hypothesis in relation to the surfacing of anti- colonial activities in Europe, Asia, and Africa among other continents (321). He argues that development of an intercontinental third world counteracting modernity can be traced in regards to the key figures of the sovereignty resistance and the functions women advocates participated. Thus he recommends that the nature of the radical engagements were a combination of both native and the cosmopolitan configurations of rational and cultural struggle that gave rise to fresh types of awareness that thrived in conjunction with anti-colonial political application3 (Young, 320-323).

According to Brown, the encounters and interactions experienced between imperial powers and individuals of different modes and degrees that subjected the world to imperial power between the late 19th Century and the 20th Century (69). The role of the society was allocated according to gender and it was the role of the males to struggle and protect India against the British imperial rule. This led to rise of men such as Mahatma Gandhi as one of the most prominent male personality as an opponent of the British rule. A transition from a traditional society to a metropolis led to the emergence of a middle class society and great cities in India4 (Brown, 68-71).

Conclusion

It is clear that through the merging of the traditional politics together with some aspects of modernity was a beneficial move for India. Gandhi believed that not all aspects of foreign rule were forbidden. As much as he resisted the Imperial British Rule he saw it as a necessity to merge both the traditional and modern aspects of politics.

Bibliography

Gandhi, M. (2002). «Indian Home Rule» (or Hind Swaraj, 1908) in James H. Overfield, Sources of Twentieth Century Global History, (Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 212-216.

Young, R. J.C., (2001). «Gandhi»s Counter-Modernity», Postcolonialism: An Historical Introduction, Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 316-334.

Brown, J. M. (1999). «Gandhi: A Victorian Gentleman: An essay imperial Encounter», Journal of Imperial and commonwealth History, (27:2,), 68-85

1
Gandhi, M. (2002). «Indian Home Rule» (or Hind Swaraj, 1908) in James H. Overfield, Sources of Twentieth Century Global History, (Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 212-216.

2
Gandhi, M. (2002). «Indian Home Rule» (or Hind Swaraj, 1908) in James H. Overfield, Sources of Twentieth Century Global History, (Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 212-216.

3
Young R. J.C., (2001). «Gandhi»s Counter-Modernity», Postcolonialism: An Historical Introduction, Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 316-334.

4
Brown J. M. (1999). «Gandhi: A Victorian Gentleman: An essay imperial Encounter», Journal of Imperial and commonwealth History, (27:2,), 68-85