WОRKFОRСЕ РLАNNING RЕРОRT

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Running head: 1WОRKFОRСЕ РLАNNING RЕРОRT

Workforce Planning Report

Table of Contents

3Executive summary

4Introduction

5Methodology

6Findings

11Conclusion and Recommendations

12Appendices

35References

Executive summary

Strategic workforce data analysis involves examining and interpreting various metrics and data about the workforce within the relevant external and internal environmental factors, in order to identify risks within the workforce. This analysis is an essential component of reliable strategic planning with regard to the workforce. Moreover, critical analysis of this vital data is imperative in identifying issues that were previously unknown or the emerging issues involving the workforce at the organization.

This report analysis and evaluates the health services workforce data with the aim of providing conclusive evidence which can endorse or disprove the existing assumptions regarding the workforce, that informs key decision-making within the organization. By communicating the outcomes of the workforce analysis to relevant stakeholders, this report will provide meaningful evidence that will justify their decision making in the organization. In addition, this report targets the stakeholders who might not be accustomed to the language that is associated with workforce reporting.

Targeted strategic workforce reporting that is effective is vital in facilitating the proper implementation of the appropriate workforce strategies. Moreover, it allows for the adjustment or termination of the existing policies so that that the required workforce can be achieved and sustained whilst mitigating risks. If organizations embrace mature workforce reporting that is guided by thorough workforce data analysis and evaluation, organizational planning can significantly be improved in terms of efficiency (Walshe & smith, 2011).

The purpose of analyzing the workforce metrics was determined in consultation with the key stakeholders and the most relevant information that was needed about the workforce was age by gender for all professionals, pivot, professionals by functional group, professionals by site, and some other specific professionals. The key stakeholders who would utilise the information from the workforce metrics was identified as the analysis would inform their planning and decision making. The integrity of the data was ascertained by examining the strengths and weaknesses in the data. This ensured that the data was able to gauge the workforce confidently, and that valid conclusions could be drawn from them (Segal & Bolton, 2009). The workforce metrics had to be clearly defined so as to ensure a mutual understanding, and to allow for comparative analysis to be carried out so as to assist in forecasting of future trends within the workforce.

  1. Introduction

1.1 Purpose

By establishing a common language that relates to workforce metrics to organizational outcomes, this report aims at providing a platform that can be used to engage more effectively with the executive to work in partnership with the organization. In addition, this report is geared towards providing critical information that is useful for the managing an organizations workforce to produce the desired outcomes and output.

1.2 Rationale

The workforce of any organization is widely regarded as the most important assets and investment. Therefore, there is need for the business to manage, understand and strategize for it appropriately. Strategic workforce planning and reporting is vital in providing information that promotes understanding, planning now and in the future and supporting effective management.

1.3 Scope

This report will provide a way of measuring the associated strategies and initiatives that involve workforce management and planning. Moreover, this study will cover the risks associated with the workforce, and how key workforce metrics can be utilized to mitigate those risks in order to achieve the desired results from the workforce.

  1. Methodology

In order to achieve the desired outcomes, critical workforce data, and metrics were keenly analyzed and evaluated. Various data sets were compared and analyzed to ascertain the key differences and identify the deficiencies within the workforce. Workforce data that is relevant to the organization’s desired outcomes was monitored in order to identify emerging workforce issues. The metrics were used to gauge some of the quantifiable components of the organizations performance such as the quality of service or revenue. Furthermore, the metric was used in strategic workforce analysis and reporting to measure some quantifiable workforce activity and the likely implications for the performance of the organization.

For effective workforce reporting and analysis, key organizational stakeholder who are responsible for strategic workforce and financial planning were consulted to ensure that the provided information was relevant to the delivery of the organizational outcomes. Also, it ensured that the information supported the strategic financial and workforce planning. The two main consideration that were followed while undertaking the strategic workforce analysis and reporting include understanding and identifying the workforce risks to organizations and the management of those risk in order to mitigate the potential effects.

In the strategic analysis and reporting of the workforce in the health sector, workforce metrics were used to gauge some quantifiable components of the organization and various aspects of the workforce activity and profile. The utilized metrics were meaningful, measurable and relevant to the organization in question. Some of the factors that were deliberated while analyzing the workforce metrics include: the purpose, the data source, the audience, the data integrity and definitions.

  1. Findings

Workforce metrics were grouped to form common themes. Metrics such as the total FTE (the full-time equivalent), age profile and gender were grouped to and compared in order to come up with conclusive data in the respective fields. The FTE was used as a metric to ascertain how many full-time equivalent male and female employees are directly employed by the hospital at some point in time. In addition, it was used to determine the number of full-time equivalent continuing employees active in the hospitals. The full-time equivalent data is vital in indicating the number of FTE employees according to the aggregate hours worked by full-time and part time employees at appoint in time. This workforce data is key in informing decisions regarding the management of employee budgets allocation and ensuring adequate staffing within the hospital. Moreover, metrics retrieved from graphs are useful in measuring the workforce cost and workforce capacity. This data has then been grouped with the gender and age metrics to come up with more specific information regarding the workforce.

The age profile metric has been grouped with FTE data and gender data in order to achieve specific and detailed information that is desired by the stakeholders. The age profiles break down the employee headcount by age groups. This metric is critical in evaluating the potential risk that is posed by the likely age retirements and the likely loss of skills, knowledge and experience within the healthcare departments. When this metric is grouped together with the age profiles and the FTE metrics, the workforce data that can be retrieved from the analysis of most of the figures, is broken down to small categories, making it easier to make group specific workforce management and planning decisions without generalizations. Additionally, the age profile metric is vital in understanding the behavior and preference of employee, thus informing employment value proposals.

The gender profile metric used along with the FTE and the age profile is useful in the breaking down of the total headcount by the number of men and women healthcare workers in the hospital. The metric has been used to monitor and identify the composition of the hospital’s workforce, and to help in promoting the diversity of the workforce.

The pivot workforce information in the Excel sheets uses the count of positions and the FTE count to determine the Occupational groupings or the job family of the workforce at the hospital. The data used in the analyzing the workforce by pivot, breaks down the total number of full-time equivalent employees by the professional group or job family. This pivot data is vital in enhancing the understanding of the structure of the hospital’s workforce, to monitor the professional groupings that are important for the proper running of the organization as a whole and to identify risks due to shortages in the labor markets (Gurbutt, 2011). This workforce data is also vital in monitoring the over-resourced and the under-resourced departments within the hospital thus promoting effective workforce allocations in all the departments. More so, Occupational grouping data is key in understanding the trends that are presented within the data for different professions.

Workforce data analyzed in appendices: figure 3 involves the classification of professionals by functional group. The work function profile metric is helpful in breaking down the sum of full-time equivalent employees by the work function, including the continuing functions and temporary projects. This metric can also be used to ascertain the number of employees on long-term transfer to projects and the number of vacancies that arise as a result of the transfers. The professional by function data is useful for assessing the implications of temporary projects on the workforce and scrutinizing and evaluating the exact staffing levels at the hospital over time.

In analyzing and reporting on the workforce data of the health care services, the metrics from appendices: figures 4 represents the professional by site. This metric breaks down the headcount by the site or the geographical location where the healthcare professionals are working. This workforce data is particularly useful to the hospital because it has a widespread workforce. This data also helps the key stakeholders to know the trends arising within the data for different sites and through various workforce themes. Moreover, the site workforce data is vital in connecting the outside labor market, including local and regional labor markets.

Occ therapy data encompasses age bracket by gender, age bracket by length of service, employment status, site and functional group. In age bracket by gender, the Occ therapy data in appendices: figure 5 combines the age profile metrics and the gender profile metrics to compare the full-time equivalent in terms of the age of the male and female staffs under the Occ therapy profession. From the graph, it can be ascertained that the age bracket of 24-34 years has the highest number of male and female employees in the Occ therapy department. Appendices: Figure 6 represents the age by length of service data in the Occ department. The metrics indicate that the highest number of employees at Occ therapy are aged between 24-34 years and they have worked for around 6-10 years. This metric can be useful in monitoring the loss of vital knowledge and experience from the institution and the retention rate. Employment status data in figure.7 is useful in breaking down the total headcount by the sum of part time employees and full-time employees. The metrics indicate that the majority of employees at Occ therapy are full-time employees. This data can assist stakeholders better understand the organization’s workforce profile and workforce availability. The Occ therapy data shown in Figure 8 represents workforce data using the site or location profile metric. The data in the graph compares the number of employees working in different sites such as community health centres, hospital A, hospital B and sub-acute, using the sum of FTE and the count of positions as the key metrics. Figure 9 show workforce data of employees in the Occ therapy department using the work function profile metric. The information represented shows the ongoing functions and the temporary projects measured in terms of both the count of positions and total full-time equivalent.

Data from figure 10 represents age bracket by gender in the pharmacy department. The highest number of both male and female employees in the pharmacy department is the age bracket of 24-34 years. Conversely, the lowest number of both male and female employees in the same department is in the age bracket of 65 plus years. In figure 11, the data represents age bracket by length of service. This combines the age profile metric and the length of service data to provide detailed information about the number of years that each age bracket has served within the department. Figure 12 indicates the employment status of the total number of full-time equivalent within the pharmacy department. The largest number of employees within this department are full-time. Figure 13 represents workforce data by site, the count of positions and the sum of FTE between hospital A and hospital B. The metrics indicate that hospital A has a much larger workforce in the pharmacy department as compared to hospital B. figure 14 represents data from the pharmacy department classified in terms of functional group. In terms of both the count of positions and the sum of FTE, the clinical support services has the highest number of employees compared with the core services.

The podiatry is represented by workforce data in figure 15, which shows the age bracket by gender data. The graph combines the FTE data of both male and female employees to ascertain largest age group of male and female employees working in the podiatry. In figure 16, the age profile metric is grouped with the length of service to provide data on the number of years each age bracket has served in the podiatry. Figure 17 provide workforce data on the employment status of staff in the podiatry. According to this data, most employees in this department are under full employment. Figure 18 represents data relating to the site or location of employees in terms of the total FTE and count of positions in Hospital A and the community health centers. Figure 19 shows the breakdown of full-time equivalent and the count of position employees in terms of work function. This is useful in analyzing the real staffing levels within the community-based health service.

The psychologist profession is represented by figure 20, which provides workforce data in terms of age bracket by gender. In this metric, the highest number of male and female employees are in the age bracket of 24-34 years. In figure 21, the age bracket by length of service data indicates the total number and FTE of various age groups and the number of years in service as psychologist. Figure 22 represents the psychologist employment status in terms of those in full-time employment and part time employment. The data is broken down using FTE and the count of position. In this metric, most employees are under full-time employment. Figure 23 dwells on the workforce data relating to the site or location of work of employees. The count of positions and the total FTE is compared in three different locations, which include the community health centres, Hospital A and Hospital B. The community health centres have the largest number of employees by count of positions and the total full-time equivalent. Figure 24 represents functional group data that encompasses both the FTE and count of positions, with integrated community & hospital having the largest number employees in terms of the sum of FTE and count of positions.

  1. Conclusion and Recommendations

4.1 conclusion

Systematic and consistent monitoring of relevant workforce data is helpful in identifying the emerging issues within the workforce. If these issues are found to be workforce risk, practical mitigation can be employed before the full effect of such risk is realized. Monitoring will also help in assessing the effectiveness of the policies that are employed through workforce planning and management. More importantly, systematic and steady monitoring will enable the understanding of the current workforce by the senior planners and managers in the organization. Information which is retrieved from workforce data is valuable to organizations as it provides a strong foundation for planning. Furthermore, such information promotes discussions geared towards better understanding of the present demand and supply factors that influence the prospective workforce and the factors that may result in workforce gaps.

  • Any issue that can pose a risk to the proper provision of organizational results and outcomes can be considered a workforce risk. These risks arise when there is a misalignment of the existing workforce within the organization and the workforce that is obligated to deliver its goals (Health Workforce Australia, 2011).

  • Organizations should move quickly to mitigate the risks that can stem from issues such as critical staff shortages within a particular department in the healthcare sector, significant workforce retirement intentions and increasing number of staff exits from the hospital (Disselkamp, 2013).

  • The most important consideration involves monitoring workforce data which is of importance to the health sector (Duckett & Stephen, 2009).

  • In addition, workforce data has to be analyzed to identify workforce related issues involving service delivery, and reporting to key stakeholders within the health sector on the workforce risk, in order to inform decision making (Hovenga, grain & IOs Press, 2013)

Appendices

Workforce Planning Report

Figure 1: Age by gender for all professionals

Table 1: Age by gender for all professionals

Female Nos.

Female FTE

Male Nos.

Total Nos.

Total FTE

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  1

Figure 2: Pivot (All professionals)

Table 2: All professionals

Professionals

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

Dietetics & Nutrition

Occ Therapy

Pharmacy

Physiotherapy

Podiatry

Psychologist

Rad Therapy

Radiographer

Social Work

Speech Path

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  2

Figure 3: Professionals by functional group

Table 3: Professionals by functional group

Professionals

Administration

Clinical Support Services

Community Based Health Service

Core Services

Core Services — Medical

Core Services — Surgical

Integrated Community & Hospital

Mat leave

Maternal & Child Health Services

Administration

Clinical Support Services

Community Based Health Service

Core Services

Core Services — Medical

Core Services — Surgical

Integrated Community & Hospital

Mat leave

Maternal & Child Health Services

Total No.

Total FTE 

Dietetics & Nutrition

Occ Therapy

Pharmacy

Physiotherapy

Podiatry

Psychologist

Rad Therapy

Radiographer

Social Work

Speech Path

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  3

Figure 4: Professionals by site

Table 4: Professionals by site

Professionals

All sites

Community Health Centres

District

Hospital A

Hospital B

Mat Leave

Sub acute

All sites

Community Health Centres

District

Hospital A

Hospital B

Mat Leave

Sub acute

Total No.

Total FTE

Dietetics & Nutrition

Occ Therapy

Pharmacy

Physiotherapy

Podiatry

Psychologist

Rad Therapy

Radiographer

Social Work

Speech Path

Grand Total

Occ therapy ( Figures from 6 to 10):

Workforce Planning Report  4

Figure 5: Age bracket by gender

Table 5: Age bracket by gender

Total Nos.

Total FTE

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  5

Figure 6: Age bracket by length of service

Table 6: Age bracket by length of service

Total No.

Total FTE

11-15 yrs

16-20 yrs

21-25 yrs

26-30 yrs

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  6

Figure 7: Employment status

Table 7: Employment status

Employment statue

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

0

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  7

Figure 8: Site

Table: Site

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

All sites

Community Health Centres

Hospital A

Hospital B

Sub acute

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  8

Figure 9: Functional group

Table 9: Functional group

Functional group

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

Administration

Community Based Health Service

Core Services

Core Services — Medical

Core Services — Surgical

Integrated Community & Hospital

Maternal & Child Health Services

Grand Total

Pharmacy (graphs from 11 to 15):

Workforce Planning Report  9

Figure 10: Age bracket by gender

Table 10: Age bracket by gender

Female Nos.

Female FTE

Male Nos.

Total Nos.

Total FTE

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  10

Figure 11: Age bracket by length of service

Table 11: Age bracket by length of service

Total Nos.

Total FTE

0

11-15 yrs

16-20 yrs

21-25 yrs

26-30 yrs

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  11

Figure 12: Employment status

Table 12: Employment status

Employment status

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

0

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  12

Figure 13: Site

Table 13: Site

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

Hospital A

Hospital B

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  13

Figure 14: Functional group

Table 14: Functional group

Functional group

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

Clinical Support Services

Core Services — Medical

Grand Total

Podiatry (graphs from 16 to 20):

Workforce Planning Report  14

Figure 15: Age bracket by gender

Table 15: Age bracket by gender

Female Nos.

Female FTE

Male Nos.

Total Nos.

Total FTE

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  15

Figure 16: Age bracket by length of service

Table 16: Age bracket by length of service

Total Nos.

Total FTE

0

21-25 yrs

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  16

Figure 17: Employment status

Table 17: Employment status

Employment status

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

0

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  17

Figure 18: Site

Table 18: Site

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

Community Health Centres

Hospital A

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  18

Figure 19: Functional group

Table 19: Functional group

Functional group

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

Community Based Health Service

Core Services

Grand Total

Psychologist (graphs from 21 to 25)

Workforce Planning Report  19

Figure 20 : Age bracket by gender

Female Nos.

Female FTE

Male Nos.

Total Nos.

Total FTE

0

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  20

Figure 21 : Age bracket by length of service

Table 21: Age bracket by length of service

Total Nos.

Total FTE

0

11-15 yrs

16-20 yrs

21-25 yrs

26-30 yrs

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  21

Figure 22: Employment status

Table 22: Employment status

Employment status

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

0

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  22

Figure 23: Site

Table 23: Site

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

Community Health Centres

Hospital A

Hospital B

Sub acute

Grand Total

Workforce Planning Report  23

Figure 24: Functional group

Table 24: Functional group

Functional group

Count of Position

Sum of FTE

Community Based Health Service

Core Services

Core Services — Medical

Integrated Community & Hospital

Maternal & Child Health Services

Grand Total

References

Buykx, P., Humphreys, J., Wakerman, J., & Pashen, D. (2010). Systematic review of effective retention incentives for health workers in rural and remote areas: towards evidence-based policy, Australian Journal of Rural Health, 18(3), p. 102–109.

Department of Health (2010). Planning and Developing the NHS Workforce: The National Framework. Retrieved from the World Wide Web:

Duckett, Stephen J. (2009). Interventions to Facilitate Health Workforce Restructure. Australia and New Zealand Health Policy, Vol. 2. 29 June. (p. 14).

Emslie, S., Hancock, C. P., & Healthcare Governance Limited. (2009). Issues in healthcare risk management. Oxford: Healthcare Governance Ltd.

Gurbutt, R. (2011). Decision making and healthcare management for frontline staff. London: Radcliffe Pub.

Health Workforce Australia (2011). National Health Workforce Innovation and Reform Strategic Framework for Action 2011-2015.

Hovenga, E. J. S., Grain, H., & IOS Press. (2013). Health information governance in a digital environment. Amsterdam: IOS Press.

In Disselkamp, L. (2013). Workforce asset management book of knowledge.

Segal, L. & Bolton, T. (2009). Issues facing the future health care workforce: the importance of demand modelling. Australia and New Zealand Health Policy, 6(12), p. 1-8.

Walshe, K., & Smith, J. (2011). Healthcare management. Maidenhead [etc.: Open University Press, McGraw-Hill.