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Understanding of gastronomy from Farmers Market and Fine wine retail cellar

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Gastronomy tourism

Introduction

As a central part of tourism, gastronomy remains essential in food production and marketing by shifting focus of agriculture into a truly unique destination for the peak tourism. More significantly, gastronomy encourages sustainable agriculture practices because it ensures the local food and drink products becomes a means of encouraging tourism destination, thus enhancing social, economic and environmental sustainability (Sims Rebecca, 111). Notably, gastronomy provides a means of sustainable tourism establishment that encourages support for local economy, diversity and ecological practices support, besides support of social life of local communities.

More crucial, there is a need to carry out an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the gastronomy tourism, as a tourism resource and product and as a way of enhancing socio-economic status. Therefore, gastronomy can be undertaken as a tourism product based on analysis of the local products from farmers market in Melbroune and Fine wine retail cellar within the Yering Station Vineyard and yarra valley.

Farmers markets and fine wine retail cellar

Over the years, tourism connection with food remains deeply connected because of focus on new and special cuisines that allows destinations to market the local products to tourists, as truly unique and appealing locations with tried and tested recipes for travelers. Food tourism remains as one of the most dynamic and creative segment of tourism because it not only enhances economic development but also enhances growth of ethical and sustainable values based on cultural consumption (World Tourism Organization, 7). As a way of advancing learning experiences, gastronomy tourism allows tourist to use their leisure time and disposable income on cuisines, farm fresh produce and wines.

As an art of good cooking and eating, gastronomy allows for the establishment of a fundamental part of culinary tourism based on food and culture with increased research, experimenting, understanding and discovery. Gastronomy remains a growing sector in the tourism sector, as majority of tourists who travel worldwide remain interested in food and drink sampling, especially with wine and local dishes when they visit new destination (Tourism Victoria). Over recent years, many countries have managed the growth of tourism based on not only food markets but also through use of traditional cultural practices as an element of cultural and tourist experience.

Notably, gastronomy remains as an ideal product of tourism consumption because the destination visited by the tourists provides them with a variety of food, recipes, chefs, and the cultural changes. In today’s tourism market there is a unique point of convergence within the existence of gastronomic tourism, based on food production, processing, transportation, storage, and cooking (Kivela, Jaksa, 360). More essential, there is a need to carry out an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of gastronomy tourism, as a tourism resource and product and as a way of enhancing socio-economic status (Noronha, Nijkamp and Rastoin, 107).

Gastronomy remains as a viable resource in combination with tourism in the reinvention of existing products besides creation of new products (Hall, Kirkpatrick and Mitchell, 168). Noticeably, unlike other tourism products and attractions, food is available all year round, as it serves to reactivate a tourist destination, especially with a decline in tourism product life cycle. Over the years, tourism has increasingly grown, based on food products sale in souvenirs, wine tours and agri-tourism, as they enjoy food festivals and campaigns.

Through markets, restaurants and festivals, gastronomy gains distribution channels based on local and traditional food resources as tourism products. In order to achieve development based on promotion and distribution of local agro food products, gastronomy tourism plays a fundamental role in strengthening of cultural heritage in global food homogenization (Sims Rebecca, 112). In the promotion of local food and drink and as a way of sustaining tourism in Melbourne food markets, there has been increased consumption of local food by tourists, besides buying local products leading to growing recognition of the tourism destination (World Tourism Organization, 10).

Gastronomy tourism has been enhanced through the use of the website as an interactive channel of communication, for promotion and marketing of local food products for producers and consumers who have the interest in the new tourism venture. With the increased improvement of living standard, gastronomy tourism as an art in Melbourne food market enhances its viability as a tourism destination, based on quality of experiences from tasting variety of local delicious cuisine (Tourism Victoria). Besides the vast attraction from food markets and wine vineyards, increased natural attractions from gardens and scenery create the fantastic atmosphere and magnificent natural scenes within the valley that attract more local and international visitors annually.

In Melbourne, gastronomic tourism has become a current emerging stream of tourism, because of improved culinary tourism facilities that include cooking schools, food tasting, book and magazines, which focus on food culture. More significantly, tourists are attracted by events that seek to present cooking equipments and food products from the local markets in the food and wine festivals held by local communities. With increased participation in cooking classes tourists learn about restaurants and special traditional cuisines as Melbourne remains significant in being the largest food market that attracts both female and male participants. Increased food markets are established from packaging of items from the cooking schools product development program, as an adventurous means of tourism enhances the culture of Melbourne’s, because it is enriched with something for everyone.

Remarkably, the use of food markets in Melbourne, in the promotion of gastronomy tourist, has remained successful, especially with the promotion of well-trained chefs who are long term experienced employees in renowned restaurants. In addition, the restaurants used for cooking schools are well maintained and equipped because it offers a favorable and attractive place to host tourists as customers who use the facility for vacation and conference bookings (Hall, Kirkpatrick and Mitchell, 166). More notably, the tourists find the local cuisines to be their favorite dishes while they learn more by participating in the cooking schools and make comeback visits into the restaurants, when on vacations.

Through the tourism commission, Melbourne has received wide markets locally and internationally, during campaigns for its distinct destination for a variety of food and wine festivals, based on strong readily accessible natural experiences and heritage links (Sims Rebecca, 108). More remarkably, gastronomy tourism in Melbourne opens up an interactive channel of communication between producers and distributors in the catering industry. Indeed, gastronomy tourism in Melbourne has continuously benefited both the large and small scale farmers in the rural areas, especially in local product marketing.

On the other hand, Yarra valley remains as one of the well recognized food and wine tourism region in Victoria, as it is found in the vast wine growing location that has a huge attraction to both local and international vacationers. Notably, with its locality being close to central Melbourne, the valley has over ninety wineries which enhance its growth as a leading world class wine supply destination (Yarra Ranges Shire Council). With vineyards that range from largely corporation held refineries to small owned companies, the valley has a vast supply of local wine that offers local culinary experiences. Wine from Yarra valley remains regionally viable as it is sold in the farmers markets, cellar door outlets and specialty food stores besides being utilized in the regional restaurants.

Noticeably, the growth of the wine vineyards in Yarra valley attracts millions of tourists who visit the wineries, besides other historic sites including sanctuaries, parks and gardens. Increased economical and social development in the region has been advanced by growing numbers of tourists who annually visit the region and are accommodated in caravans, motels, hotels, farm stay and camping grounds (Tourism Victoria). The valley is vast in agricultural produce based on its cool climate and natural setting, which enhances growth of grapes, fruits and vegetables for both the local and international market (Kivela, Jaksa, 358). More significantly, the Yerring station remains the largest farmers produce market that allow monthly purchase of quality local produce especially with the growth of organic and chemical free vegetables and fruits (Kivela, Jaksa 359).

The most common means of marketing Yarra Valley is through strategic and effective integrated marketing with government funded initiative that seek to enhance the growth of the holiday destination. With increased longer visitors stay and high levels of expenditure, the tourism industry in Yarra valley in the region has recognizably remained as a stylish food and wine destination.

Yerring Station market that was opened to market farmers produce has grown from being open quarterly to monthly because of increased customer encouragement and demand from growers and purchasers, so as to exchange the fresh local produce more frequently (Kivela, Jaksa, 374). As a unique way of establishing Yarra valley brand farmers are encouraged to help each other sell their produce through cooperative effort while selling relatively similar or improved processed products.

Through three established information centre, referrals from one centre to another promote longer stay for tourists and complementary transport, especially during special events that enhance the tourist experience. In Yarra valley, tourism officers, who manage the information centers on a daily basis, encourage tourism oriented business groups to develop tourism growth within the valley and organize local events in the food and wine markets.

Cooperation between businessmen from the food and wine markets, champions for the development of goodwill within the markets as they establish economies of scale. As a way of enhancing growth in tourism attraction, increased focus on the establishment of more food and wine events leads to unique regional products (Noronha, Nijkamp and Rastoin, 110). The ground distribution information centre remain as a cross promoting online network that provide information and booking through the internet services.

Increased tourism markets encourage market analysis for wine tourism, so as to establish proper efficient channels for tourism products. In order to achieve development based on promotion and distribution of local agro food products, gastronomy tourism plays a fundamental role in strengthening cultural heritage in global food homogenization (World Tourism Organization, 8). In the promotion of local food and drink, as a way of sustaining tourism in Melbourne and Yale valley, the classification is based on the relationship with tourism activities, purpose of visit and general motivation for travelling.

Gastronomy tourism has enhanced advantage as it develops multi-faceted relationship through introduction of new products that seek to increase sales and diversify destinations for tourists. As a unique venture of tourism the food market and wine cellars ensure diversification of tourism ventures, especially through the use of the website as an interactive channel of communication for promotion and marketing of local food products (Yarra Ranges Shire Council). In addition, gastronomy ensures improvement of living standard, as it enhances viability of surrounding community social and economic status as tourism destination is based on the quality of experiences from tasting variety of local delicious cuisine (World Tourism Organization, 5).

Gastronomy tourism ensures that local food products are exported through food markets, cooking classes and wine festivals, thus enjoying notable success. In addition, growth of increased number of tourists enhances job creation through vast attraction from food markets and wine vineyards, leading to increased natural attractions from gardens and scenery, as it creates the fantastic atmosphere and magnificent natural scenes within the valley that attract more local and international visitors.

Gastronomy tourism leads to achievement of local development as it remains essential in food production and marketing by shifting focus of agriculture into a truly unique destination for the peak tourism within rural setting of vineyards. More significantly, gastronomy promotes and distributes local agro food products as it strengthens sustainable agriculture practices (Kivela, Jaksa, 370). In general gastronomy ensures the local food and drink products becomes a means of playing key role in tourism destination, thus enhancing social, economic and environmental sustainability (Noronha, Nijkamp and Rastoin, 107). Furthermore, gastronomy provides a means of sustainable tourism establishment that encourages support for local economy, diversity and ecological practices, besides support of social life for local communities.

On the other hand, gastronomy tourism has several limitations including lack of utilization of local products by the local people, even as they market their products to the tourists (Hall, Kirkpatrick and Mitchell, 170). Local people from urban areas fail to consume local products especially those from rural areas, whereas in other times the competition from other areas become significant, where products fail to meet the set quality of standards.

Conclusion

Given that there is an increased competitive advantage in marketing of the gastronomy tourism there is need for promotion of its advancement as a growing venture of tourism. Noticeably, the growth of the gastronomy tourism is established in Yarra valley, Melbourne and Yerrin Station market that attract millions of tourists who visit the food markets and wineries besides sanctuaries, parks and gardens.

With the establishment of increased economical and social development in the regions with advanced gastronomy tourism, there is a need to advance growing numbers of tourists who visit annually as a way to improve individual and community lifestyle. In addition, it is essential for communities to take advantage of their vast agricultural produce based on its cool climate and natural setting, as means of growth in both the local and international market. In conclusion, there is a need for largest farmers produce growth in the market, so as to allow for quality local produce as means of the gastronomy tourism, especially with the growth of quality organic and chemical free vegetables and fruits.

Work Cited

Hall, Derek, Kirkpatrick Irene, and Mitchell, Morag. Rural Tourism and Sustainable Business, Channel View Publications, Bristol: 2005.

Kivela, Jaksa. “Tourism and gastronomy: Gastronomy’s influence on how

tourists experience a destination”. Journal of Hospitality & Tourism research.2006: pp.

354-377.

Noronha , Teresa, Nijkamp, Peter and Rastoin, Jean. Traditional Food Production and Rural Sustainable Development: A European Challenge. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., UK: 2009.

Scarpato, Rosario. “Gastronomy as a Tourist Product: The Perspective of

Gastronomy Studies«. Routledge. New York: 2002.

Sims Rebecca. “Putting place on the menu: The negotiation of locality in UK

food tourism, from production to consumption”. Journal of rural Studies. 2010: 26 (2). Pp. 105-115.

Tourism Victoria. ‘Visitors to Victoria’s Regions-Summary Results Year Ending December 2003.’ viewed 28 August 2014, from <www.tourism.vic.gov.au>,

Yarra Ranges Shire Council. ‘Yarra Ranges Shire Council Home page.’ viewed 28 August 2014, from <www.yarraranges.vic.gov.au>

World Tourism Organization (UNWTO).
Global Report On Food Tourism. viewed on 28 August 2014, from <http://dtxtq4w60xqpw.cloudfront.net/sites/all/files/pdf/global_report_on_food_tourism. pdf, 2012>