UNDERSTANDING AND PLANNING FOR EFFECTIVE HEALTH 1 Essay Example

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Understanding and Planning For Effective Health Promotion Evaluation

Understanding and Planning For Effective Health Promotion Evaluation

This paper is a summary of the literature concerning the understanding and planning for effective health promotion evaluation. The research brings about programs, benefits, issues, activities, the challenges that rotate around the effective health. While selecting the literature, the following criteria were observed:

  • The value the research gives in understanding effective health promotion

  • Usage of the significant concepts

  • Reliability of each source

  • The information applicability in the Australian context.

Bauman, A., & Nutbeam, D. (2013). Evaluation in a nutshell: a practical guide to the evaluation of health promotion programs. McGraw Hill.

The book gives strategies and technical issues to be followed when evaluating the accountability of the health promotion programs. The book goes ahead to give evaluation styles to be followed when checking how the health programs are appropriate. Additionally, the book has an online learning center that has case studies and examples of the various health programs and how they promote health amongst the populations. This book is for the individuals and organizations that have undertaken health programs and want to understand how they are promoting health amongst themselves. Additionally, the book shows which interventions work and which ones that will fail. The book is thus applicable in the Australian healthcare industry to guide during health promotion evaluation.

Barnidge, E. K., Radvanyi, C., Duggan, K., Motton, F., Wiggs, I., Baker, E. A., & Brownson, R. C. (2013). Understanding and addressing barriers to implementation of environmental and policy interventions to support physical activity and healthy eating in rural communities. The Journal of Rural Health, 29(1), 97-105.

The paper shows that when understanding and planning for effective health, the rural people are at a greater risk than those in urban areas. This document emphasized that the rural populations are more at the risk of becoming obese than the urban ones due to lack of activities such as the fitness and lack of intervention policies. Specifically, the rural people fail to achieve appropriate health due to culture, population size, human capital, and adequate policies. This document is for the government, individuals, and other organizations that are looking forward to evaluating the efficiency of rural health. It discusses how the various policies and environmental programs can, in fact, promote healthy practices such as eating amongst the rural populations. It helps the scholars and the health practitioners to understand the rural areas health issues.

Bourke, L., Humphreys, J. S., Wakerman, J., & Taylor, J. (2012). Understanding rural and remote health: a framework for analysis in Australia. Health & Place, 18 (3), 496-503.

The paper discusses how the rural populations are misunderstanding and as a result have ineffective health plans. Accordingly, the paper shows that it is even impossible to have health workers who are willing to work and remain these remote areas. Notably, these issues are not only in Australia, but internationally since these rural areas are less misunderstood. The paper goes ahead to give a conceptual framework that helps to understand the countryside and the type of health service that they receive. The paper identifies that the rural areas health care providers are constrained by the social and health systems structures. This article is important for any health investors who are planning to invest in the rural areas. It is applicable because it helps them understand these areas and thus plan for efficient health care promotion programs.

Dudley, D. A., Winslade, M. J., Wright, B. J., Cotton, W. G., McIver, J. L., & Jackson, K. S. (2015). Rationale and study protocol to evaluate the SunSmart policy intervention: a cluster randomized controlled trial of a primary school-based health promotion program. BMC public health, 15(1), 42.

The document contributes to understanding and planning of effective health promotion by discussing the methods that are appropriate for protecting the school children from sun burns. According to this article, the Australian children are exposed to sunburns, and therefore the schools have undertaken the SunSmart policy to protect them. The article gives the impacts of this strategy and discovers that the teachers together with parents and students must be involved in ensuring the success of this process. Apparently, when all are involved, the strategy has enabled sustainability in the sun protection practices. This document is essential for any organization that plans to undertake such sun protection activities all around the world. It does give the guidelines and helps in health promotion amongst the school children.

Kohl, H. W., Craig, C. L., Lambert, E. V., Inoue, S., Alkandari, J. R., Leetongin, G., …, & Lancet Physical Activity Series Working Group. (2012). The pandemic of physical inactivity: global action for public health. The Lancet, 380 (9838), 294-305.

In reference to health promotion, this article looks at how the emphasis of the physical activity can enable people to promote health evaluation. Globally, physical inactivity is the fourth cause of death, which means it is a pandemic. Notably, the benefit of physical activity has been promoted amongst populations since the 1950s, however, not much concentration has been given on how it improves the promotion of health. In fact, it is nowhere in most of the planning, advocacy and even training and development of the employees. As a result, the document emphasized that the infrastructure that promotes the physical activity to advance and advocate for it. Additionally, a global framework that seeks to promote physical activity as a form of health evaluation should be undertaken. The information is applicable not only in Australia, but also all around the globe in pursuit of effective health.

Moore, G. F., Audrey, S., Barker, M., Bond, L., Bonell, C., Hardeman, W., … & Baird, J. (2015). Process evaluation of complex interventions: Medical Research Council guidance. BMJ, 350, h1258.

The document enables understanding and planning of health issues connected to obesity and smoking to achieve efficiency in the healthcare industry. Notably, the paper states that there is complexity when it comes to choosing the appropriate intervention to undertake while dealing the health evaluation programs. The Randomized Control Trial (RCTs) which were previously regarded as the standard for coming up with effective techniques is becoming increasingly exhaustible. This paper thus advocates for the use of the Medical Research Council (MRC) guideline while dealing undertaking the RCTs for selecting the evaluation program for a particular health agenda. This document is people who look forward to evaluating, building themes, and coming up with intervention technologies that are based on the MRC 2008 guideline. The paper gives a systematic approach that guides a person towards developing an evaluation procedure. It is applicable in any health care context.

White, B. K., Burns, S. K., Giglia, R. C., & Scott, J. A. (2016). Designing evaluation plans for health promotion mHealth interventions: a case study of the Milk Man mobile app. Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 27(3), 198-203.

The paper is about the evaluation of the health promotional interventions that use the mobile apps. Specifically, the document looks into the mobile health (mHealth) app the Milk Man which is for expectant fathers. According to the article, there are four methods and tools for evaluating the app. Notably, this app had already socially acceptable and tested using the Randomized Control Trial (RCT). This document is for the people using any mobile health program considering the present mobile technology is greatly sophisticated. This paper gives a framework which a health organization can follow while evaluating the success of the process that they are using for health promotion. It is applicable when coming up with principles, technological performances, and expected behavioral practices of such organizations.

White, V., Williams, T., & Wakefield, M. (2015). Has the introduction of plain packaging with larger graphic health warnings changed adolescents’ perceptions of cigarette packs and brands?. Tobacco control, 24 (Suppl 2), ii42-ii49.

The paper is about the packaging of cigarettes and the health promotion efficiency it has amongst the population. In discussing the effect of different packing strategies, the paper enables the readers to understand how a simple act such as changing the packaging of a particular product can bring about health promotion efficiency among smokers. Notably, after changing the packing, there was reduced brand positive image between 2011 and 2013. Interestingly, even some smokers went ahead to agree that some brands had better packing than others and thus, this reduced smoking significantly between 2013 and 2011. This document is for the government, institutions, and communities that are struggling to promote a health evaluation program on a particular drug. It clearly emphasizes that the people, including those addicted to such products can reason with slight changes such as packing.

Zwar, N., Harris, M., Griffiths, R., Roland, M., Dennis, S., Powell Davies, G., & Hasan, I. (2017). A systematic review of chronic disease management.

The document is about the managing of the chronic diseases such diabetes, asthma, among others that are very common all over the world. The report identifies the classes of these chronic diseases that are common and require primary care within Australia. The paper is for people who want to understand about the chronic diseases and the health promotion that is effective for each of this disease. The authors first define the term chronic so that to differentiate them with other types of diseases. The paper identifies the different models of treatment that are used in various countries such as USA, UK, Canada, Scandinavia, New Zealand, and the Netherlands. Also, it identifies how these models are developed by showing the various roles of the stakeholders and the impact of such standards. With such information, any individual, organization., and government all around the world can develop a model to manage any of this chronic disease. The information in this article is very crucial to the growing issues of chronic illness.

References

Bauman, A., & Nutbeam, D. (2013). Evaluation in a nutshell: a practical guide to the evaluation of health promotion programs. McGraw Hill.

Barnidge, E. K., Radvanyi, C., Duggan, K., Motton, F., Wiggs, I., Baker, E. A., & Brownson, R. C. (2013). Understanding and addressing barriers to implementation of environmental and policy interventions to support physical activity and healthy eating in rural communities. The Journal of Rural Health, 29(1), 97-105.

Bourke, L., Humphreys, J. S., Wakerman, J., & Taylor, J. (2012). Understanding rural and remote health: a framework for analysis in Australia. Health & Place, 18(3), 496-503.

Dudley, D. A., Winslade, M. J., Wright, B. J., Cotton, W. G., McIver, J. L., & Jackson, K. S. (2015). Rationale and study protocol to evaluate the SunSmart policy intervention: a cluster randomized controlled trial of a primary school-based health promotion program. BMC public health, 15(1), 42.

Kohl, H. W., Craig, C. L., Lambert, E. V., Inoue, S., Alkandari, J. R., Leetongin, G., … & Lancet Physical Activity Series Working Group. (2012). The pandemic of physical inactivity: global action for public health. The Lancet, 380(9838), 294-305.

Moore, G. F., Audrey, S., Barker, M., Bond, L., Bonell, C., Hardeman, W., … & Baird, J. (2015). Process evaluation of complex interventions: Medical Research Council guidance. BMJ, 350, h1258.

White, B. K., Burns, S. K., Giglia, R. C., & Scott, J. A. (2016). Designing evaluation plans for health promotion mHealth interventions: a case study of the Milk Man mobile app. Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 27(3), 198-203.

White, V., Williams, T., & Wakefield, M. (2015). Has the introduction of plain packaging with larger graphic health warnings changed adolescents’ perceptions of cigarette packs and brands?. Tobacco control, 24(Suppl 2), ii42-ii49.

Zwar, N., Harris, M., Griffiths, R., Roland, M., Dennis, S., Powell Davies, G., & Hasan, I. (2017). A systematic review of chronic disease management.