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Art of Chinese history

Development of Chinese tea
Introduction In
the
books
and
stories of history, it has been
said
that one of the Chinese emperors
was one day
boiling his water
and a leave
fell from the tree into his boiling water, when
he
drunk to his surprise
the mix he
felt uplifted and revitalized. He
concluded
that
the
leaves
had
made
the
changes
and,
therefore, he
decided to bring
some to be experimented
on. This
small
event
led to the begging of tea in the Chinese community
and
the
rest of the
world
.According to a writer
named Lu Yu, who has written a lot
concerning
tea in china, the Chinese tea has been
enjoyed
for
more than 4000 years. Tea
was
discovered
first in china, Dutch East India Company were
also
the
first to introduce
tea to the entire of Europe. The
afternoon
tea in Europe has become a standard
ritual by mid of 17th century(Kit Boey Chow, 1990). The
most
interesting
part is the two different
dialect punctuations that exist in the
word “tea” in which almost
all
the worldly languages
use, they
were
borrowed from the Chinese-cha
and
tee
that
come
originally from two different
dialects of the Chinese. The
languages of most of the
countries that imported
tea from northern
china, including Turkey, Japan and Russia, their languages
have
adopted
some
sound that slightly
vary from the Chinese «cha» such as china, chay
and chai. The
countries within the
southern
maritime
borrowed
the
word in the
form
te, tee
and
tea. These
countries
include Spain, Germany and England. This
word
was
borrowed basing on the
southern Chinese pronunciations
(Forbes & Henley, 2011).Tea is a concoction that is made from the
young
and
tender
leaves of a tree called
tea. The
difference that has developed among many
variations of the
tea that is available is due to the
processes that are used in the
manufacturing of tea(Parkinson, 2005). The
main
process that is used in manufacturing of tea is roasting
and
fermentation. Through the
fermentation
process
the
tea
leaves
that are originally
deep
green
turn to be reddish
brown in color. The
longer
the
fermentation
takes the
stronger
the
color. Depending on the
extend
or
time in which the
roasting
and
fermentation
processes
take, the
fragrance of tea
changes from floral
then fruity and
finally
malty(Forbes & Henley, 2011).Tea that has not been
taken through the
fermentation
process
is known as green
tea. When
the
green
tea
is steeped
then
it
changes to jade green
or
yellow
green in color, they
also
give off the
fresh
vegetable
fragrance. Some
examples of the
green
vegetables in chine include
the
dragon
well, and
the
green snail spring(Johnson, Bryant, & Huntley, 2012). The Chinese has named
tea that has gone through all
the
fermentation
process as red tea, but in the
west
they are known as the black tea. The
tea that is made from the black tea
leaves is usually
reddish
brown
and
had a malty aroma. The black dragon as the Chinese call
it is a good
example of the
partially fermented tea. This
particular
tea is unique in both
china
and Taiwan; these are the
most
represented
areas that produce
the
same
tea
(Evans, 2000).The oolong tea is known to have
come from three different
degrees of fermentation, the
lightly, moderate
and
the
fully
fermented
degrees. Some of the
features
used in the
identification of the
lightly
fermented oolong tea are the
full
aroma, golden color
and
clarity. A
good
example of this
tea is the Chinese Poaching(Kit Boey Chow, 1990). The moderated fermented tea
includes
types
such as, the Iron Budha, Narcissus and
the Frozen Peak. They are brown in color, a fully
mature
flavor that totally
appeals to the
senses of tested
more than that of smell, and
they are also
vaguely
sweet after taste. Tea
was
then
infused from the
moderately fermented tea to the
fully
fermented
that
includes
the White Hair Oolong that has a red-orange color
and
smells fruity aroma
(Forbes & Henley, 2011).For one to be able to make a perfect
pot of tea, it is crucial to pay
attention to the
quality of water, the
amount of tea
leave
put, the
temperature of the
water, and
the teapot that is used(Heiss & Heiss, 2007). Water that has very
low
mineral content also
known as soft
water should be used, it should also be clear
and
totally
fresh. The
accurate
temperatures of water
that
the Chinese use
and is totally
recommended should be about between hundred
and hundred and twelve Celsius. For
the
lightly
fermented
tea
leaves, the
temperature can be as low as ninety degrees
Celsius(Forbes & Henley, 2011).The
proportions of the
tea
leaves that should be used to that of the
water
also depend on the
tea
leaves that are used. The teapot can be filled from either one quarters to about three quarters depending on the on how tightly the
tea
leaves
were
curled
while
roasting
and
rolling
were
done. Then
the teapot can now be filled with water, the steeping time
usually
starts after a minute
but
this depends on the on the
tea(Kit Boey Chow, 1990). The
amount of time
required
for
the
same
tea
leaves to be used in brewing
another
tea should be quite
lengthy. The
best teapot that should be used
while
preparing
the fermented tea is the
clay ceramic purple teapot. The
pot’s size should be directly
proportional to the
size of the
cups. The
cups
also are recommended to have white interiors in order to get
the
right
and
appropriate
assessment of tea. This
the
process
and
the
details
that
the Chinese use
when
making their tea
(Evans, 2000).People
who are passionate with tea drinking also
enjoy
the
beauty of the teapots and
they
possess a good
feeling about them. In the
republic of china, today
small
support is being
used to steep
tea by the
citizens in their homes. This
particular
process has been
passed down generations from the
time of Ming dynasty
emperor Sheng Stung in the sixteenth century of china. The
full
aroma
and
the
sweetness
that
the
tea
has
been
usually
fully
brought out when
small
pots are used(Forbes & Henley, 2011). During the Ming and Ching dynasties, the
support that was
being
used
was
the
purple
clay ceramic teapots of the Yihsing and Kiangsu. Any of the
pieces that were
made by the
master potter was
sought by almost everybody. While
most of the
master potters in the
republic of china
continued to make
the
purple ceramic clay
pots
for
tea, with time
they
have
also
been
able to come up with a good
number of new teapots with different
designs that have
been
praised enthusiastically by the
public. Collecting
the teapots have
turned out to be one of the
most
fashionable
way of passing
time in the Chinese culture
(Evans, 2000).Tea is part of the
daily
lives of the
people of china
just as coffee is part of the
daily
lives of the
west. In the
west, one can always
notice
that there are many teahouses scattered in the
streets, it has a close
relationship with the Chinese tea
culture that has been
introduced in the
west. Many
poets
and
musicians
have
created
poems
and
songs that have
reinstated
the
culture of tea within these
nations(Kit Boey Chow, 1990). The Chinese are highly
critical about tea; the Chinese people
always
demand
high
quality of tea, water
and their wares. Tea in china is always
grown at altitude of about three thousand and seven thousands meters above the sea level. The Chinese usually
use
the
spring
water, snow
and
rain
water to make
tea. During the
autumn
spring
and
the
rain
water is always
considered to be the
best to make
tea.
The Chinese always
put
much
emphasis on both
the
quality
and
taste of water, to them fine
water that should be used to make
tea should possess
qualities
such
cool, clean, flowing
and
pure In
(Forbes & Henley, 2011).china, there are a number of customs about tea. A
person
who is hosting
friends
or a new
person should put
tea to about only seven tenth of the
cup
and
the
other three tenth is said is supposed to be filled with both
friendship
and
affection(Parkinson, 2005). In addition, the
teacup is expected to be empty with only three gulps. Tea is a paramount
aspect of the
emotional
character of the Chinese people. The Chinese always
offers
tea
immediately a guest
arrives. To them serving one with a cup of tea is just
but
more of a show of politeness. It is like sharing something that is very
sweet
and
enjoyable
it is also a way of showing
respect to the
visitors. Avoiding
and not taking not even a single sip when
served with a cup of tea is considered to be rude
and
disrespectful in some
parts of the Chinese community There is a
(Evans, 2000).saying that goes “the China have
the
best of the teahouses in the
world
while Chengdu has the
best teahouse within China” china has deserved
this
reputation throughout the
world. It
does not only
pose
the
most
awesome
tea
houses, but
they
have
the
best
team that is served in the
most
special
way. Tea has been a totally
indispensable
part of the Chinese community since the
ancient
times; it has been
identified as one of the
daily
necessities among the Chinese(Kit Boey Chow, 1990). It is said
that during the mid-time of the Tang Dynasty, a man
who
was
named Lu Yu got into the Buddhist Monkhood in his young
age
and
came
out
when
he
was
old into a secular
life. Later
he
was
recognized as the
best
for
summarizing
the
knowledge
that his predecessors
and
the
contemporaries
had into one of the
first
compendium in the
world
mainly in the
tea, the
tea
classic. The
work
that Lu Yu created
helped a lot in popularizing
the
art of drinking
tea in china. He
managed to make everyone within the
country to be an avid
tea
drinker from the
emperor himself to the
hawker in the
streets. Nations that bordered
china
including Japan, Koresthe southeast of Asia also
adopted drinking of tea
culture
due to the
work At
(Forbes & Henley, 2011).the
moment
more than forty countries in the
entire
world
grow
tea, the Asian nations are the
most
prolific and
they
produce over 90 percent of the
entire
tea
production in the
world. His origin of the
tea tree in all the
other
parts of the
world
either
directly
or
indirectly
came from china. As
earlier
explained
just like the tree the
origin of the
words that refer to tea
all over the
world
originated from the Chinese character that is pronounced as “cha During
” (Kit Boey Chow, 1990).the
summer
season, is believed
that
tea can easily
dispel
the
strong
heat
and
bring an instant
cool
and
relaxed
feeling. At this
particular
time of the
year, one usually
fined
people in the Chinese teahouses having
chatted over with a cup of tea. Medically, tea
leaves
have
been
proven to poses a number of chemicals that include about 20 to 30 percent of the tannic acid, this is known to be an anti-inflammatory, and
provision of germicidal properties. The Chinese belief
that
tea is medicinal
and
taken
for
this
reason
sometimes. Additionally, tea has an alkaloid also
referred to as caffeine of about five percent, this
always
works as a stimulant within the
nerve
system
and
the metabolism process. Tea that has aromatic
nature
also is believed to help in solving
problems
digestion of food
and
fats. This
means
that
the
food is critical
for
most of the
people
whose
basic
food is meat like most of the
minority
groups of people
living in china

(Evans, 2000).Conclusion
Although
the
tea
originated from china, it has spread to almost
all
parts of the
world. The
culture of taking
tea
every
day has been
adopted by many
other
cultural
communities in the
world. It is the
smell of the
tea that is always
sought
after during the Chinese tea
ceremonies,
it is also
this
smell that has attracted
many
people into using
tea on the
daily
basis. Tea is known to be the
most
famous
and
liked
drinks in the
entire
globe and
many can attest to that

.

References Evans, J. C. (2000).
Tea in China: A History of China’s National Drink. Contributions to the Study of World History, Number 33. Forbes, A., & Henley, D. (2011).
New York; Westport: Greenwood Press.China Heiss, M. L., & Heiss, R. J. (2007).
‘s Ancient Tea Horse Road. Chiang Mai: Cognoscenti Books.The Story of Tea:.
A Cultural History and Drinking Guide, Johnson, R., Bryant, S., & Huntley, A. L. (2012). «Green
179–185.tea
and
green
tea catechin extracts:. An overview of the clinical evidence.»
Maturitas 73 (4) , 280-356.Kit Boey Chow, I. K. (1990). All Teas in China. Parkinson, R. (2005). «
179 — 675.The Origin of Finger Tapping — Chinese Tea History.» 45-78.