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  • Sam was accused of having murdered his pregnant wife in the morning of July 4, 1954. He was thought to have had an unfair case ruling after the press made insightful publications that greatly influenced how the case was handled. The presiding judge on the case did not order the jury to disregard the press and allowed them to make allegations that had no proof against Mr. Sheppard (Cooper et al, 1995). The murder weapon which was thought to be a surgical blade was never found and there was nothing to tie Sam to the murder but the atmosphere created by the press served to insight people to prosecuting him. The jury had been in sighted by the press and they made their ruling considering points that had no proof. Blood splatter evidence found in their home served to prove that Sam had not in fact been at the scene of the crime when his wife was murdered and played a big role in his acquittal (DeSario et al 2003). The case still fascinates the public because of the wrongful imprisonment of Mr. Sheppard and the fact that the evidence found did not implicate him but they still convicted him where he served ten years in prison before he was acquitted.

Sam was accused of having murdered his pregnant wife in the morning of July 4, 1954. He was thought to have had an unfair case ruling after the press made insightful publications that greatly influenced how the case was handled. The presiding judge on the case did not order the jury to disregard the press and allowed them to make allegations that had no proof against Mr. Sheppard (Cooper et al, 1995). The murder weapon which was thought to be a surgical blade was never found and there was nothing to tie Sam to the murder but the atmosphere created by the press served to insight people to prosecuting him. The jury had been in sighted by the press and they made their ruling considering points that had no proof. Blood splatter evidence found in their home served to prove that Sam had not in fact been at the scene of the crime when his wife was murdered and played a big role in his acquittal (DeSario et al 2003). The case still fascinates the public because of the wrongful imprisonment of Mr. Sheppard and the fact that the evidence found did not implicate him but they still convicted him where he served ten years in prison before he was acquitted. Essay Example

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The Sam Sheppard case

Sam Sheppard was a neurosurgeon at the Los Angeles County Hospital who was convicted of murdering his wife Marilyn Reese Sheppard who was pregnant at the time in 1954 at their Ohio home. This paper discusses the case, its evidence the end result and why people are still fascinated seventy years after it took place.

Sam was accused of having murdered his pregnant wife in the morning of July 4, 1954. He was thought to have had an unfair case ruling after the press made insightful publications that greatly influenced how the case was handled. The presiding judge on the case did not order the jury to disregard the press and allowed them to make allegations that had no proof against Mr. Sheppard (Cooper et al, 1995). The murder weapon which was thought to be a surgical blade was never found and there was nothing to tie Sam to the murder but the atmosphere created by the press served to insight people to prosecuting him. The jury had been in sighted by the press and they made their ruling considering points that had no proof. Blood splatter evidence found in their home served to prove that Sam had not in fact been at the scene of the crime when his wife was murdered and played a big role in his acquittal (DeSario et al 2003). The case still fascinates the public because of the wrongful imprisonment of Mr. Sheppard and the fact that the evidence found did not implicate him but they still convicted him where he served ten years in prison before he was acquitted.

Works Cited.

Sheppard v. Maxwell, 384 U.S. 333, 86 S. Ct. 1507, 16 L. Ed. 2d 600 (1966).

Cooper, Cynthia L., and Sam Reese Sheppard. Mockery of justice: The true story of the Sheppard murder case. UPNE, 1995.

DeSario, Jack, and William D. Mason. Dr. Sam Sheppard on Trial: The Prosecutors and the Marilyn Sheppard Murder. Kent State University Press, 2003.