SАINT LОUIS МISSОURI RЕGIОN Essay Example

  • Category:
    Geography
  • Document type:
    Article
  • Level:
    Masters
  • Page:
    1
  • Words:
    365

Running head: 1SАINT LОUIS МISSОURI RЕGIОN

SАINT LОUIS MISSOURI RЕGIОN

SАINT LОUIS МISSОURI RЕGIОN

The geographical coordinates St. Louis Missouri is 38° 38′ 53″ N, 90° 12′ 44″ W. The region is situated on the western banks of the famous Mississippi River. In addition to that, it is built at around 6o meters high on the terraces. It is also worth mentioning that the surrounding of the city is fertile. The population records dating 2008 show that the population of the city was at 2.8 million. Over the increased development, the current population is expected to be higher. (Rozoff at el., 2003).

There are several unique geographical factors that easily identify the region. First of all is the landscape. The region is dominated by stone build palaces. These are believed to have been the offices of the heads of states in the 19th century. Secondly is the climate of the region. The region is between the humid continental climate and sub-tropical climate. There are no large water bodies or mountains that can be seen in this area. During the spring season, the region experiences tornadoes and winter storms. At such periods of the year, the temperature falls up to −18 °C. In contrast, the average annual temperature is around 13.9 °C. This means that the region is relatively cold throughout the year. On average the region receives an annual rainfall of 1040 millimeters (Hurley, 2000).

Finally, the flora and fauna of the region are unique. Records reveal that before the city was built, the region was dominated by forest. Trees such as oak and hickory dominated the forest. The seasonal changes lead to the color change of the leaves changes making the region unique. It is also worth noting that during the wet season such as spring frogs inhabit the region. Finally, the communities surrounding the region include Cahokia, Clayton Missouri and Lemay Missouri among many other adjacent communities.

References

Hurley, A. (2000). Fiasco at Wagner Electric: Environmental justice and urban geography in St. Louis. Environmental History, 460-481.

Rozoff, C. M., Cotton, W. R., & Adegoke, J. O. (2003). Simulation of St. Louis, Missouri, land use impacts on thunderstorms. Journal of Applied Meteorology, 42(6), 716-738.