Report On Health Care System in Canada Essay Example

6REPORT ON HEALTH CARE SYSTEM IN CANADA

Report On Health Care System in Canada

Report On Health Care System in Canada

Health Overview in Canada

The health care in the country is publicly funded with the private entities offering medical services. Based on the Health Act that the government developed in 1984, citizens receive free medication from the facilities operating in the country. The state assures its citizens of the quality of services via the federal standards. To boost efficiency, Canadian government counts on the provincial level of administration to handle medical care in order to reduce costs at the national level. Ideally, medication remains confidential between physicians and patients while the provincial insurer takes care of the cost incurred.

The citizens enrol for the programme in order to receive the free medical services, which include the maternity charges. On the contrary, vision and also the dental care depend on the provincial health authorities. Most provincial administration requires the employers to cater for the dental and vision services of their workers. Moreover, medical cover excludes cosmetic surgery and other forms of operation considered unnecessary and service-seekers get private insurers or pay with their money (Fierlbeck, 2011).

Expenditure on Medical Care

Studies indicate that Canada spends approximately 11.2 percent of its GDP on health cover. In 2013, the government spent $211 billion to offer medical services to its citizens. The federal government allocates the money depending on the report forwarded by researchers and elected leaders. The allocation may vary depending on reports on the level of medical demands in different provinces. However, the figure arrived at in most cases is adequate for the services. The rest of the money collected through taxation goes t other projects such as education, infrastructure and other services. Research indicates that the demands might increase due to the increasing number of the elderly persons and the general deteriorating health of the people. Considering the percentage of GDP allocated to the health care, it shows that the level of services is high unlike in many other countries in the world (Fierlbeck, 2011).

Funding of health care in Canada is from the federal government. The federal government channels the funding to the provincial levels of medical services through fiscal transfers. The government sources the funds from income taxes collected from personal and corporate earners. Extra taxes come from sale taxes collected by the provinces. The money collected from taxes first accumulates at the federal government before the economic experts undertake budget allocation for the country. Based on the amount collected, the federal government decides the percentage that goes to the medical covers. Thereafter, the federal government distributes the amount arrived at to the ten provinces in Canada. The amount that each province receives depends on its population. Generally, seventy percent of the healthcare emanates from the public sector while the remaining percentage comes from the private sector. The budget on the provincial level is approximately forty percent of the total budget. The federal government monitors the medical expenses in order to curb deficit in the sector (Fierlbeck, 2011).

Major Issues in Canadian Healthcare

First, the country spends a large figure of its GDP on medical healthcare and consequently strains the tax payers. Despite the figure, Canadians do not receive assurance about the quality of services offered at the medical facilities. According to critics, medical facilities regulate the level of their services in an attempt to reduce costs as required by supervisors monitoring health expenses. According to some medical studies, the country is the fifth most expensive state because of the amount it allocates to its health sector. Evidently, the country does not want to alter the situation despite criticism it receives. Second, the country faces a challenge of straining its budget because of the increasing number of the elderly persons that require long term medical care. The healthcare does not consider the factor and the impending situation might undermine the quality of services offered in the facilities. Third, since the studies indicate that the number of working people in Canada continues to increase, the healthcare is likely to face a challenge of deficient physicians. Actually, the healthcare system does not consider the future with inadequate medical practitioners (Gratzer, 2002).

Managed Care

Managed care refers to a type of medical insurance where medical facilities provide services to the patients while the cost o treatment goes to a managing company. The government monitors and regulates the facilities that offer services in order to reduce the redundant hospitals and other facilities. The Managed care is not available in Canada but there are plans to establish the system. The country relies on the services from all the facilities entrusted with the responsibility of offering medical services. The medical practitioners discouraged the federal government from establishing managed care, arguing that it will undermine the quality of services offered to the patients. They claim that setting up a watchdog to monitor services could mark a step towards distrust of the physicians and facilities (Marchildon, Mossialos, Allin, and European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies, 2005).

Recommended Technological Innovations

The introduction of electronically monitored health records will likely boost the quality of services offered to patients. The computerized recording should become accessible to the top authorities of the federal government in order to ensure that there is transparency. At the same time, it will allow the government to know the future changes it should implement to further improve the service provision. At the same time, a technological system where there is use of performance indicators need establishment in order to monitor the quality of services offered at the facilities. The system will ensure that the incompetent physicians do not continue discharging their questionable services. Similarly, the federal government can eliminate facilities offering inadequate facilities (Samuels, 2003).

Policies Affecting Health System

The Heath Act developed in 1984 regulates the service provision to patients. The at offers guidelines on how medical facilities and physicians should offer quality services to the patients. It dictates that the hospitals or physicians should not charge the patients of the expenses incurred. Instead, it requires that the facility forwards the records to the provincial insurer. At the same time, it indicates the services that the healthcare does not cover such as beauty surgery, dentistry and vision treatment (Naylor, 1992).

Budget Provision in Canada

The 11.2 percent of the Canada’s GDP spent on health cover varies depending on the year of budget allocation. For example, in 2013, the government spent $211 billion to offer medical services to the patients. The figure is high compared to other sectors of the economy. The uniqueness of the health budget shows how the country favours medical services as compared to other sectors (Fierlbeck, 2011).

Comparison with UAE

While Canada spends over 11.2 percent of its GDP on health, UAE spends barely 2.9 percent of its per capita income. However, the two countries have high standards of medical care in the world. The UAE ensures that there is quality service provision to the citizens, much like Canada (Kloep, 2012).

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Fierlbeck, K. (2011). Health Care in Canada: A Citizen’s Guide to Policy and Politics. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Gratzer, D. (2002). Better Medicine: Reforming Canadian Health Care. Toronto: ECW Press.

Kloep, M. J. (2012). Managed Equipment Services as a Conceptual Business Opportunity Model for the GCC with Focus on UAE: An Institutional and Economic Analysis. Burgdorf: Herz.

Marchildon, G. P., Mossialos, E., Allin, S., & European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies. (2005). Health Systems in Transition: Canada. Copenhagen: WHO Europe.

Naylor, C. D. (1992). Canadian Health Care and the State: A Century of Evolution. Montreal u.a: McGill-Queen’s Univ. Press.

Samuels, R. (2003). Constitutionalizing Universal Public Healthcare in Canada: Integrating Quality-of-life Considerations with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Ottawa: Agora Cosmopolitan.

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