Recruitment & Selection Essay Example

  • Category:
    Management
  • Document type:
    Assignment
  • Level:
    Undergraduate
  • Page:
    3
  • Words:
    1611
  1. Why it is important to evaluate the recruitment and selection process

How effective any recruitment and selection programme is can be assessed in terms of how the employees that have been selected perform the job and deliver service to the concerned organisation. The recruitment and selection programme also needs to be assessed in regard to how easy or difficult it is to implement as well as the cost implications that are associated with the recruitment process. This essay will explore some of the reasons why evaluation of the recruitment and selection process is important to an organisation.

To start with, it is important to evaluate the recruitment and selection process because of the need for organisations to establish the potential benefits that they have derived from the process. In particular, there is need for organisations, after conducting the recruitment and selection process, to assess the efficiency and success of the various practices that were undertaken in the process. Since the recruitment and selection process can be an expensive undertaking, there is need for the organisation involved to assess whether the methods that were used in the process were effective in attaining the intended objectives as to justify the expenses incurred in the process.

Assessment of the recruitment and selection process is also necessary in order to ensure that the practices involved during the recruitment and selection are worthwhile investments made by an organisation. That is, the evaluation process is done to determine whether in deed the recruitment and selection process focused on the needs of the organisation and whether the gaps in the organisation were filled. This is to say that an evaluation process will help to determine whether an organisation was able to get the appropriate individuals or human capital that it required for the portfolio of tasks that it wants to undertake.

Evaluation of the recruitment and selection process is also important in ensuring that the practices that are used in attracting and selecting individuals to take jobs in an organisation are responsive to the changing dynamics of the labour market. Through evaluation, the human resource function of an organisation is able to determine whether the practices that it used to attract and select individuals for available job vacancies reflect the changing needs of the job and the individuals to perform them. This in turn can enable an organisation to have a more focused planning for its job functions as well marketing for the positions that are available.

In conclusion, recruitment and selection programmes need to be evaluated in order to determine whether the programme met the desired objectives and satisfied the changing needs of the organisation as well as its employees. Specifically, evaluation enables an organisation to determine whether the recruitment and selection process was efficient and successful. It also helps to ascertain whether the process was an undertaking worth investing in by determining whether the selected individuals meet the needs of the organisation. Evaluation also helps an organisation to ensure that its recruitment and selection practices meet the changing needs of jobs and the individuals to perform them.

  1. Two (2) types of employment legislation that can impact on the RSP process and how each one of them influences the practice of RSP

Employment legislations can potentially affect how the recruitment and selection process (RSP) is carried out. This is because such legislations not only guide the employment relationship but are also concerned with the RSP. In some cases, employment legislations and government policies can even inform how organisations undertake human resource planning by specifying the composition of a firm’s workforce. This essay looks at two types of employment legislation in Australia and the various ways in which employment legislation can have an impact on the practice of RSP.

The first legislation is on equal employment opportunity and anti-discrimination. This law, which is applicable at both state/territory and federal levels, requires employers to ensure that they facilitate the establishment of a workplace that is free from discrimination as well as harassment. Therefore, employers must ensure that they understand their responsibilities and rights under this law. More importantly, employers must put effective anti-harassment and anti-discrimination procedures in place in the organisation based on the stipulations of the equal employment opportunity and anti-discrimination legislation. As such, organisations need to establish policies that ensure that there is no discrimination or harassment against people based on their sex, gender, religion, marital status, physical impairment, pregnancy, race, sexuality, criminal record, age, and physical features among other attributes. Therefore, organisations must design their recruitment and selection processes in a manner that ensures that there is no discrimination or harassment against the recruits or people to be selected. In this way, the legislation guides the manner which the recruitment and selection process is carried out.

Another legislation is the Age Discrimination Act 2004. This laws helps ensure that people are not discriminated against on the basis of their age in various aspects of their life, including employment. Employers should consider the Age Discrimination Act 2004 before undertaking a recruitment exercise so that they may not be accused of sidelining some groups of people in their employment. Specifically, based on the aforementioned legislation, organisations are not supposed to make reference to the age of the targeted applicants when they place an advertisement for job positions. Employers are also not required to specify that number of years that a person has worked or has experience in a certain job since this can give an indication of the targeted age group. Instead, they should just indicate the extent of experience required for a job. Selection of employees must also be based on merit and not age. All these requirements have an impact on the recruitment and selection process in that they tend to limit the specific requirements that an employer would specify during recruitment and also highlight some guidelines to be used in selection.

In conclusion, employment legislations can impact on the recruitment and selection process through acting as guidelines for the RSP and being directly concerned with the process. As shown in the essay, the legislation on equal employment opportunity and anti-discrimination requires organisations to have frameworks through which they can avoid harassment and discrimination in the workplace, which ultimately affect the practice of RSP. As well, the Age Discrimination Act 2004 requires organisations to avoid discrimination based on age. This not only affects how organisations recruit but also has a bearing on the selection process.

  1. Job analysis is the most important stage in the recruitment and selection process

Job analysis is an organised way of identifying the constituent responsibilities, duties and desired results of a job, as well as the knowledge, skills, abilities and experience that are needed to carry out the various duties. The job analysis process involves seeking to answer various questions regarding a job such as the responsibilities and duties that the job entails, the time frame within which the job is to be completed, the expected results, where the job is to be done, the significance of the job and the conditions under which the job is performed. This essay will discuss job analysis and what makes it the most crucial stage in the recruitment and selection process.

It can be seen from the definition of job analysis and what the process entails that the practice gives one a clear understanding of the details and nature of a position that needs to be filled. This implies that before the recruitment process begins, one has to ensure that the job position is properly evaluated to make sure that attempts at recruitment are not discriminatory and that the recruitment process takes place in accordance with the essential needs of the job position in question. Job analysis is therefore a critical component of the recruitment and selection process since it offers standards and benchmarks for both the employer and the potential employee. This is because conducting a job analysis helps one to question what a given job position is about, why it exists, as well as the attributes that are required of the person to fill it.

It is based on the information that is gathered during a job analysis process that an organisation can effectively design the recruitment and selection process that follows. That is to say that based on the profile of the job, an organisation can demonstrate which measures, predictors, or selection tools are appropriate for the selection process. It is also from the job analysis information that the details to be used in the recruitment process can be formulated. For instance, the job analysis information will help an organisation to determine where to recruit and how to package the recruitment message. The details of the job will then be included in the advertisement for the job and this will be used to inform potential applicants about the existence of the job as well as the requirements of the job. More importantly, selection processes such interviews are based on the details of a job analysis. Specifically, during a selection exercise such as a job interview, one can base the process on the tasks to be carried out as well as the expectations of both the job applicant and the employer.

In conclusion, looking at what job analysis entails, it can be said that the practice is the most important stage in the recruitment and selection process. This is because job analysis involves evaluating a job to determine what the job position is about, why the job exists, and the knowledge, skills, abilities and experience that the person to fill that position should have. It is based on the job analysis information that an organisation can design its recruitment and selection tools.