PROS AND CONS about Gillette company Essay Example

  • Category:
    Marketing
  • Document type:
    Case Study
  • Level:
    Undergraduate
  • Page:
    1
  • Words:
    514

Gillette Inc.

Pros and Cons about Gillette Inc.

Gillette is a global organization that mainly focuses on male products (Gillette.com). Its products are so male oriented that it understands the products they desire, need and has therefore perfected the art of marketing the products to the men. This has been so successful that the firm currently garners a whooping annual figure of $8 billion in sales, while commanding a leading 70 percent market share in the global razor and shaving business. Close to a billion men in the world are consumers of Gillette products (Bahadir and Tuli 2002, p. 19).

Gillette is one example of a company that deals in a number of product lines as opposed to concentrating on one product line. This is a marketing strategy that helps an organization to not only build sales but also move the firm in an entirely new direction. The company’s line of razors, and blades, includes Sensor, Mach 3 and Lady Gillette among others, while the line of toiletries comprises of Right Guard, Dry idea and Gillette Foamy. The writing instruments include Flair and Paper Mate, giving Gillette a wide product mix. Offering a wide product mix attracts buyers from different market segments. This goes along way in increasing profitability levels (Jain 2001, pp.5-10).

However, Gillette’s marketing strategy also presents a downside. Gradually, the company has transitioned their positioning from that of focusing on functionality tributes of their products, and instead featuring them as being representative of a particular type of lifestyle. Considering their marketing slogans of “Look sharp, Feel Sharp” and later “The best a man can get”, these are indicative of a lifestyle that is classy and sophisticated. It does not depict a regular man that one would find on the farm or working as a grocery shop attendant. Gillette sponsors a wide range of sport ranging from football, cricket, rugby and boxing among others, thus being a form of self expression product as opposed to being a functional product. Focusing on lifestyle as opposed to functionality appears as a logical strategy of sidestepping competition and connecting with consumers at a more personal level. However, this may backfire on a company because the need for self expression is satiable as other alternatives continue to proliferate (Webster 1992, pp. 5-12).

The disadvantage of lifestyle products is that the competition usually stems from brands in other categories, for instance shaving products competing with shoes, perfumes and even clothes. This may see Gillette competing for market share with Gucci, Starbucks, Ralph Lauren and Apple Inc. (Foumier, Fetscherin and Breazeale 2012, p. 87).

Reference List

Bahadir, S.C. and Tuli, K.R. 2002. Measuring marketing productivity: Linking marketing to financial returns. New York (NY), Abe Books.

Foumier, S., Fetscherin, M. and Breazeale, M. 2012. Consumer-Brand Relationships: Theory and Practice. New York (NY), Routledge.

Gillette: Men’ Razors & Shaving Products. Available at http://gillette.com/en-us [Accessed 21 March 2016]

Jain, S.C. 2001. Marketing Planning & Strategy: Casebook.  California, Amazon Books pp 5-10.

Webster, F.E. 1992. The Changing Role of Marketing in the Corporation.
Journal of Marketing. Vol. 56, no 4: pp 1-17 .