MANAGEMENT

  • Category:
    Management
  • Document type:
    Assignment
  • Level:
    Masters
  • Page:
    1
  • Words:
    297

Management

File Franklin Electronics Case

  1. The results regarding schedule and overrun are correct. According to the report, the cost variance overrun had grown by 78% and the schedule variance slippage increased by 45% (Kerzner, 2007).

  2. The vice president failed to analyze the information that the manager from Franklin’s Electronics used the incorrect method for calculations. The incorrect methods analysis were then used in presenting comparing the monthly percentages to months. Thus, the cost variance and the schedule indexes should be calculated and compared to gain the correct results on the cost and schedule variance issues.

  3. The additional information that should have been included is the first end value report.

  4. The accounting group from Franklin Electronics does not understand the earned value measurement. For instance, when making their reports they missed reporting the parallel monthly reports that they missed to submit.

  5. Lack of providing the end value report stipulate that Franklin Electronics do not understand project management (Kerzner, 2007).

  6. Yes, the provision of monthly end value reports is used as a replacement for interchange meetings. That is; if the Franklin Electronics does provide the accurate monthly-earned value reports, there will be no reason for conducting the interchange meeting.

  7. The Franklin Electronics accounts group should say to the Spokane Industries vice president that the mistakes perceived in the calculations led to the misunderstandings mainly since they lack experience in the earned value reports. However, they should promise that they would be keen on all calculations and approaches used to ensure they submit the right values and as expected according to the agreement. Thus, they need to state steadily that they will improve on the schedule variance slippage values.

References

Kerzner, R. H. (2007). Project Management: A Systems Approach to Planning, Scheduling, and Controlling. New York: John Wiley & Sons.