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Locate a scholarly journal article on the use of WMD during World War II. Using APA format, write a two-page paper summarizing the use, implications, and repercussions (i.e., side effects, sociological effects, or political effects) of the WMD Essay Example

  • Category:
    Other
  • Document type:
    Article
  • Level:
    Undergraduate
  • Page:
    1
  • Words:
    616

4WEAPON OF MASS DESTRUCTION

Weapon of mass destruction

Weapon of mass destruction

Weapons of mass destruction can be defined as weapons that are capable of killing and causing considerable harm to many people or cause immense damage to the biosphere, natural structures as well as man-made structures. The weapons could be radiological, biological, chemical or even nuclear in nature (Pichtel, 2011). This piece of paper will give a critical discussion on the use of WMD particularly during the World War II. Much emphasis will be given to the use, implications as well as repercussions involved in the use of WMD during that time.

Tu (2011) assert that chemical weapons were used by the Imperial Japanese Army in China and Japan during the World War II. The Army had various types of chemical weapons which it used in China during the World War II. Different chemical agents were used in various forms of weapons. While some weapons had one agent, other had a mixture of two or more chemical agents. Some of the chemical agents used in the weapons include blister agent, choking agent, blood agent and vomiting agent among others. However, at the end of the war, Japan discarded all the chemical weapons by burying them underground and dumping them into the sea. In addition to the harm the chemical weapons had during the World War II, the leftover chemical weapons have continued to be dangerous to the society especially in China. This includes issues of environmental damage as a result of decay.

According to (Pichtel, 2011), terrorism is usually an issue of concern when it comes to the discussion of the use of WMD. To a large extent, some of the uses of WMD can count as acts of terrorism. This is more so because terrorism involves deliberate use of hazardous materials that can result to big numbers of casualties and cause immense damage to property. Terrorism is a criminal act that attempts to intimidate authorities through the use of violent acts motivated by ideology. It also endeavours to further political agendas. All these point out to the motive behind the use of WMD in wars such as the World War II.

It is apparent that WMD are quite harmful and have negative impacts on individuals as well as properties. For this reason, it is essential to have ways to avert their use and hence the effects. Some of the counteraction strategies that could have been applied during the WWII and in other instances as a way of reducing the consequences of using WMD include putting controls when it comes to the ownership and use of the weapons. A good example is use of handguns and assault rifles with high capacity ammunition clips, which are considered as WMD. Responsible institutions should be funded to study the impacts of WMD. Requiring registration, background checks and controls for purchase of the weapons is also a way of controlling their usage (Kassirer, 2013).

In conclusion, it is clear that WMD were used in the WWII and the effects were negative. The impact of chemical weapons of mass destruction in Japan and other places cannot be underemphasized. It is an aspect that results in a large number of casualties and destruction of properties. It is therefore important to avert the use of WMD in wars under all costs since the negatives effects are lethal.

References

Kassirer, J. P. (2013). Weapons of mass destruction. JAMA internal medicine, 173(3), 182-183.

Pichtel, J. (2011). Terrorism and WMDs: awareness and response. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press.

Tu, A. T. (2011). Chemical weapons abandoned by the Imperial Japanese Army in Japan and China at the end of World War II. Toxin Reviews, 30(1), 1-5.