KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Essay Example

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    Undergraduate
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4Knowledge Management Systems

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

  1. What is Knowledge?

Knowledge can be described as the aspect of being familiar with a concept, an idea of data through experience. This implies that when someone claims to have knowledge of something then he or she have seen, done of participated in that thing. To know someone means to have met that someone at some point in life. According to Wilson (2002), knowledge is primitive conscious of an object. In addition, knowledge can be defined as the ability of an individual to master something. Steinberg (2007) argues that being knowledgeable means having the intellectual ability to understand different concepts through previous learning or observation and experience. For example, a student may have the knowledge of a certain subject. This means that the student has mastered the concepts of the subject and have no doubt of its contents. Therefore, prior experience of a certain object is crucial to the definition of knowledge (Wilson (2002).

References

Steinberg, S., 2007. An introduction to communication studies. Cape Town: Jut & Co, Ltd.

Wilson, T. D., 2002. The nonsense of’ Knowledge Management. Information Research, Vol. 8, no. 1 < http://informationr.net/ir/8-1/paper144.html> Accessed on 09/07/2013.

  1. Concept of Information Communication and Representation

Information can be regarded as the information or data that are communicated in different formats and ways in order to communicate with another individual. Therefore, communication is learned from communication and experience. According to Zins (2007), information can be knowledge which is learned in various institutions or from past experiences. In most cases, information is representing a certain level of understanding. For example, information on learning or business is helpful in enabling an individual make decisions. Hence, information is representing different phenomena depending on how it is communicated in different patterns (Steinberg, 2007, p. 56).

Reference

Steinberg, S., 2007. An introduction to communication studies. Cape Town: Jut & Co, Ltd.

  1. Situational Analysis Using Three World Model

The three world model explains the world in three different levels. This model argues that the world is composed of world 1, which is made up of mainly physical objects such as tables, trees and chairs. It also includes human behaviours of the body and fundamental particles and forces. In world 2, the main aspects are thoughts, mental thoughts and sensation. World 3 is composed of scientific concepts, theories and arguments.

The situation

Kyle is an attendant at an electrical shop. One day a customer came with an iPad she claims to have bought in the shop but later realized it was not the genuine iPad. The customer was annoyed, but Kyle told her to have a seat before he confirmed whether the iPod was purchased from the shop and whether it was fake or genuine. Kyle took the iPad to the technician, who verified that the iPad was not fake but had some applications missing, and that is why it was not functioning as required. Kyle apologized on behalf of the owner of the shop.

Chair (seat)

Thinking of whether iPad is fake or genuine

Apologizing for missing applications

Information on where to get assistance on iPad

The commitment of trying to see the technical error in the iPad

References

.http://edwardfeser.blogspot.com.au/2010/07/poppers-world-3.html. [ONLINE] Available at:Popper’s World 3Feser, E. 2010. 

  1. Distinction Between Knowledge and Information

According to Wilson (2002), knowledge is defined as what is known to an individual. What an individual is aware of from experience is what is termed as knowledge. Knowledge involves the mental process of comprehending and understanding what we know in our minds. This implies that an individual is said to be knowledgeable depending on his intellectual ability to reason and logically use his or her mind in solving issues affecting the world. On the other hand, human beings try to express their knowledge in different ways. This means that people try to express what they know, what is in their mind through messages that take different forms such as body language, graphics, picture, spoken words or written words. The expression of knowledge in the form of different messages is termed as information. Hence, different people will have different comprehension of the same message, making it highly possible for information distortion (Wilson, 2002).

Reference

Wilson, T. D., 2002. The nonsense of’ Knowledge Management. Information Research, Vol. 8, no. 1 < http://informationr.net/ir/8-1/paper144.html> Accessed on 09/07/2013.

  1. Knowledge Management

According to Koenig (2012), knowledge management is described as the process in which an individual is able to capture, distribute and use knowledge in an effective manner in order to achieve the intended objective. Additionally, Koenig claims that Gartner Group defines knowledge management as a concept of integrating the capturing, retrieving and evaluation as well as sharing of information such as databases, procedure and policies in different enterprises. Additionally, Wilson (2002) argues that there is no single definition of knowledge management since different organization defines it differently. However, all definition revolves around the ability of a company to manage its knowledge and information.

References

Koenig, M., 2012. What is KM? Knowledge Management Explained. KM World. Available at < http://www.kmworld.com/Articles/Editorial/What-Is-…/What-is-KM-Knowledge-Management-Explained-82405.aspx> Accessed on 10-07-2013.

Wilson, T. D., 2002. The nonsense of’ Knowledge Management. Information Research, Vol. 8, no. 1 < http://informationr.net/ir/8-1/paper144.html> Accessed on 09/07/2013.

  1. Knowledge Analysis

This is the ways in which an individual uses his or her knowledge in solving everyday issues affecting his or her life. According to Kim (2011), knowledge analysis is the way a human being thinks, analyses a situation in order to establish ways to solve it by using the knowledge he has. Goldkhul (2011) argues that knowledge analysis is how individual use their knowledge in different contexts. This is aided by research and communication as well as the use of technological tools in solving problems affecting human beings. Therefore, depending on experience and intellectual know how of an individual, different individual has different tactics of analysing knowledge in solving problems (Goldkhul, 2011).

References

Goldkhul, G, (2011). Contextual Knowledge Analysis. In The 2nd European Conference on Knowledge Management. Sweden, November 8, 2001. Sweden: IEDC-Bled School of Management, 11.

Kim, J, (2011). Knowledge Analysis Guidance. In The 2nd European Conference on Knowledge Management. California, November 23, 2011. California: Information Sciences Institute. 8.

  1. Knowledge Mapping, Auditing and Models

The aspect of knowledge mapping involves the searching and discovering of information from different sources. This enables an individual to discover the knowledge gaps in the business organization. This means that the research will be aimed at establishing knowledge gaps that are not documented by different organizations. According to Ebener (2006), Knowledge gap focuses on the purpose of the knowledge gap in the organisation, the different types of knowledge, knowledge recipient and visualization of the knowledge. On the other hand, knowledge auditing deals with the assessment of knowledge that exists in a business organisation. According to Lauer and Tanniru (2001), knowledge auditing is done in order to establish as to whether the knowledge contained in an organisation is in line with the goals of the organisation. This will help to know the ways in which the organization can use the knowledge in fulfilling its goals and objectives.

Reference

Ebener, S., Khan, A., Shademani, R., Compernolle, L., Beltran, M., Lansang, M.A. & Lippman M., 2006. Knowledge mapping as a technique to support knowledge translation, Bulletin of  World Health Organization, Vol.84, no.8, pp. 636–642

Lauer T.W.  & Tanniru M. 2001. Knowledge Management Audit – A Methodology and Case Study. Australian Journal of Information Systems, vol.9. no. 9, pp. 23-42

  1. Knowledge Cycle

This is the process in which knowledge is passed through the various structures of an organisation it is created, identified, captured, shared and utilised at different levels. According to Nonaka et al (2000), the cycle involves the total time that is used from the recognition of knowledge to practical utilization of the identified and shared knowledge. The stages in the knowledge cycle include knowledge creation, knowledge storage, and knowledge sharing and knowledge utilization. During knowledge creation, the knowledge is created in order to suit specific objectives of the company. The created knowledge is stored in various knowledge information systems where it can be shared from one organisation or individual to another. In the actual utilisation, the knowledge is used in order to achieve the objective and goals of the business organisation (Nonaka et al., 498).

Reference

Nonaka, I., Toyama, R., & Byosière, P., 2001. A theory of organizational knowledge creation: understanding the dynamic process of creating knowledge’. In Dierkes, M., Antel, A.B., Child, J. and Nonaka, I. (Eds), Handbook of organizational learning and knowledge. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 491-517.

  1. Knowledge design

This is the development of different knowledge types that are intended to achieve different objectives in an organization. This is achieved through the organisation, condensation and visualization of different complex concepts of data (Wilson, 2002).

Reference

Wilson, T. D., 2002. The nonsense of’ Knowledge Management. Information Research, Vol. 8, no. 1 < http://informationr.net/ir/8-1/paper144.html> Accessed on 09/07/2013.

  1. Knowledge Management Systems Design Approaches

These are described as the various ways in which knowledge management systems are used in the drawing of architectural data and utilization of knowledge for intended purposes. According to (McDonald, 2013), knowledge management design systems approaches are systems developed to ensure that knowledge is managed in order to meet certain requirements.

Reference

McDonald, C, 2013. Knowledge Management System Design. Knowledge Management Systems (8570). Canberra: University of Canberra.

References

Buckland, M., 2012, ‘What Kind of Science Can Information Science Be?’ Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, vol. 63. no. 1, pp. 1-7.

Ebener, S., Khan, A., Shademani, R., Compernolle, L., Beltran, M., Lansang, M.A. & Lippman M., 2006. Knowledge mapping as a technique to support knowledge translation, Bulletin of  World Health Organization, Vol.84, no.8, pp. 636–642

Goldkhul, G, (2011). Contextual Knowledge Analysis. In The 2nd European Conference on Knowledge Management. Sweden, November 8, 2001. Sweden: IEDC-Bled School of Management, 11.

Kim, J, (2011). Knowledge Analysis Guidance. In The 2nd European Conference on Knowledge Management. California, November 23, 2011. California: Information Sciences Institute. 8.

Koenig, M., 2012. What is KM? Knowledge Management Explained. KM World. Available at < http://www.kmworld.com/Articles/Editorial/What-Is-…/What-is-KM-Knowledge-Management-Explained-82405.aspx> Accessed on 10-07-2013.

Lauer T.W.  & Tanniru M. 2001. Knowledge Management Audit – A Methodology and Case Study. Australian Journal of Information Systems, vol.9. no. 9, pp. 23-42

McDonald, C, 2013. Knowledge Management System Design. Knowledge Management Systems (8570). Canberra: University of Canberra.

Nonaka, I., Toyama, R., & Byosière, P., 2001. A theory of organizational knowledge creation: understanding the dynamic process of creating knowledge’. In Dierkes, M., Antel, A.B., Child, J. and Nonaka, I. (Eds), Handbook of organizational learning and knowledge. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 491-517.

Steinberg, S., 2007. An introduction to communication studies. Cape Town: Jut & Co, Ltd.

Wilson, T. D., 2002. The nonsense of’ Knowledge Management. Information Research, Vol. 8, no. 1 < http://informationr.net/ir/8-1/paper144.html> Accessed on 09/07/2013.

Zins, C., 2007. Conceptual Approaches for Defining Data, Information, and Knowledge. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, vol. 58. No. 4, pp. 479-493.