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  • In their early childhood learning, children need positive and interactive relationships with their parents, teachers and fellow children. For instance, teachers who cultivate high expectations among children or provide positive feedback to children enable them to develop their cognitive skills and develop positive attitudes towards learning (Gill and Reynolds 1999).

In their early childhood learning, children need positive and interactive relationships with their parents, teachers and fellow children. For instance, teachers who cultivate high expectations among children or provide positive feedback to children enable them to develop their cognitive skills and develop positive attitudes towards learning (Gill and Reynolds 1999). Essay Example

  • Category:
    Education
  • Document type:
    Essay
  • Level:
    Masters
  • Page:
    1
  • Words:
    387

What part do emotions and relationships play in children’s learning?

  • Emotions can be considered as various states of body and mind which consist of physiological, behavioral or cognitive reactions to situation which can be managed or directed. Emotions play a fundamental part in children’s learning. A child’s emotional state has the potential to influence their thinking and capacity to learn in both negative and positive ways (MacNaughton 2003). Emotions such as anger, stress or depression tend to distract children from attending to their various tasks in the learning process. For instance, angry or anxious children are less likely to achieve a balance between schoolwork and their emotional issue (Roeser et al 2000). On the other hand, emotions such as excitement may impair a child’s ability to attend to their learning tasks with precision and detail (Asher and Rose 1997).

  • In the course of learning, the relationships children have with their parents, teachers and other children are also an important part of their learning. The nature of their relationships with their teachers, parents or other children affects their attitudes towards learning (MacNaughton 2003). For instance, if their parents have high expectations of a child and frequently interact with them-such as helping them with their homework, the child attends to their learning with greater motivation (Gill and Reynolds 1999). Positive and friendly relationships with other children may also encourage them to learn from each other through interaction.

  • In their early childhood learning, children need positive and interactive relationships with their parents, teachers and fellow children. For instance, teachers who cultivate high expectations among children or provide positive feedback to children enable them to develop their cognitive skills and develop positive attitudes towards learning (Gill and Reynolds 1999).

References

Asher, S. R., & Rose, A. J. (1997). Promoting children’s social-emotional adjustment with peers. In P. Salovey & D. Sluyter (Eds.), Emotional development and emotional intelligence: Educational implications (pp. 196-230). New York: Basic Books.

Gill, S., & Reynolds, A.J. (1999). Educational expectations and school achievement of urban

African American children. Journal of School Psychology, 37(4), 403–424.

MacNaughton, G. (2003). Shaping early childhood: Learners, curriculum and contexts.

Berkshire, England: Open University Press.

Roeser, R., Eccles, J., & Sameroff, A. (2000). School as a context of early adolescents’ academic and socialemotional development: A summary of research findings. The Elementary School Journal, 100(5), 443-471.