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  • In conclusion, every Nation has some past History. Such history usually shapes the Nation’s international interactions and her perception of the world order. China’s historical legacy provides quite a unique example of how past experience can shape a country’s attitudes in future relations. The opium wars n unequal treaties established an enduring negative attitude among the Chinese toward the West. The Chinese perceive the West as having been always after dominating and oppressing China, (Li Zhaojie, 2001, 314-326).

In conclusion, every Nation has some past History. Such history usually shapes the Nation’s international interactions and her perception of the world order. China’s historical legacy provides quite a unique example of how past experience can shape a country’s attitudes in future relations. The opium wars n unequal treaties established an enduring negative attitude among the Chinese toward the West. The Chinese perceive the West as having been always after dominating and oppressing China, (Li Zhaojie, 2001, 314-326). Essay

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Historical Legacy of Opium Wars to China:

China’s nation-building has gone through quite an expansive spectrum of difficult radical transformational process in History. The opium wars and the unequal treaties that followed transformed China from the initial Middle-Kingdom status to a semi-colonial economy manage by foreign imperialists. Today, China has grown to become one of the major World powers. The Historical experience has significantly changed China’s view of the world order from the Confucian based Sino-centralism which emphasized China’s cultural supremacy, to nationalism that allows for sovereignty and independence within an international framework. It will be shown that the Historical legacy of the opium wars and unequal treaties to China has greatly shaped China’s contemporary view of the West as being driven by selfish interests with aim to humiliate dominate and oppress other nations, (Melancon G, 2003, 126).

To begin with, it is important to highlight the fact that during the early interactions, the British market was characterized by high demand for tea, silk and porcelain all from China. The problem however, was the lack of silver enough by the British sustain their trade with the Qing Empire. It was because of the need to resolve this payment issue that a barter system of trade was developed where Indian opium would form Britain’s purchasing power. With time however, opium generated strong addiction effects among Chinese populations leading to significant social instability. This was the genesis of the opium wars between Britain Merchants and Chinese administration. Consequently, China was made to go through at least a century of humiliation under the unequal treaty system which saw a legacy trade, dependence and gunboat diplomacy. It is true that China learned the hard way to emerge from her traditional cultural based centralism of the Confucian thinking into modern nationalism base economy. However, it is because of the same traumatic encounter with the West that makes contemporary China to always treat the West with suspicion and not willing to open up to the West, (Smith, Schack, & McKerras, 2013, 16-33).

In conclusion, every Nation has some past History. Such history usually shapes the Nation’s international interactions and her perception of the world order. China’s historical legacy provides quite a unique example of how past experience can shape a country’s attitudes in future relations. The opium wars n unequal treaties established an enduring negative attitude among the Chinese toward the West. The Chinese perceive the West as having been always after dominating and oppressing China, (Li Zhaojie, 2001, 314-326).

References

Li Zhaojie 2001. Legacy of Modern Chinese History: Its Relevance to the Chinese Perspective of the Contemporary International Legal Order, Singapore Journal of Comparative Law (2001) 5 pp314-326.

Melancon G, 2003. Britain’s China Policy and the Opium Crisis: Balancing Drugs, Violence and National Honour, 1833-1840, Ashgate p. 126.

Smith, D, Schack, D, & McKerras, C 2013, Theme 2: Historical Legacy, China’s Rise: Challenges and Opportunities: viewed 24 September 2013, at <https://bblearn.griffith.edu.au/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_4456_1%26url%3D>.