Images of Modern Women in Asia Essay Example

  • Category:
    Sociology
  • Document type:
    Essay
  • Level:
    Undergraduate
  • Page:
    1
  • Words:
    679

3IMAGES OF MODERN WOMEN IN ASIA

Images of Modern Women in Asia

Images of Modern Women in Asia

Traditional modernity struggles in many
ways to represent itself in women
and their lives. These
efforts
come in many
forms
and
different
ways in several
countries; this
paper will compare
how
traditional modernity strives to represent itself in women in Japan, Nepal, China, and Canada. Traditionally, women globally have
been
assigned
to
double
reproductive
duties; carriers of a nation’s culture
and
children. Modern
consumer
cultures in China and
other
places around the
world
use
the
images of attractive
women to not only
sell
products to women
but
also to men. In China, women
have
been
used to not only
construct
but
also
carry politicized definitions of women, as well as gender. For
example, two of the Chinese magazines
have
used their advertisements to not only
get to women
but
also
express
western
consumer
culture (Johanson, 2013). On the
other
hand, Nepal’s case is no
different from China’s case
when
it
comes to the
traditional modernity and
representation of women. The
difficulty in the
representation of traditional modernity in the Nepal Society is the Kathmandu’s middle
class
who are materially
oriented. Negations between the
dominant
political
expressions
and
women’s social
reality
make
it
difficult
for
the
representation of traditional modernity. Moreover, local
fashion in Nepal is more focused on the
class
rather than gender (Lietchy, 2013).

As
compared to Nepal and China, Canada case
when
it
comes to traditional modernity is more of Muslim women
struggling to find their place in a rather
dominant
western
culture. The Muslim women in Canada find themselves in a very
awkward
position of accepting
the
common
stereotypes that are attached to Muslim women
who
wear Hijab. These
stereotypes
include
things
such as the Muslim woman is backward
and non-professional. What is more, the
media has made
the Hijab a sign of oppression among Muslim women that is not the
case (Ruby, 2004). As
compared to China and Nepal where
traditional modernity struggles in advertising, Canada case
comes as Muslim women
trying to avoid
the
stereotypes
associated with the Hijab.

In Japan just like in China, the
context of debates among people in the
struggles of traditional modernity comes in ways of nationalism as well as identity. The
woman in the Japanese context is seen as a home, wife
and
mother
while, in China, the
woman
is seen as a carrier of culture
and
children. Taking
the two countries into account, one aspect
comes out as similar, that is, the
aspect of the
mother. Moreover, in terms of advertisement, in Japan, department
stores
also
promote
the Western culture
meaning
that
the
traditional modernity of the
country itself finds
it
hard to represent itself. Chaplin (2013), notes
that
the
department
store
do
this by encouraging
things
such as intake of whiskey
and
engagement
rings among women.

The
other
feature that makes
it
tough
for
traditional modernity struggles to represent in women’s practices is pornography. Women are fully
aware of the
rates of pornography
consumption among the
men. Furthermore, the media makes
it
worse by making
pornography
easily
accessible
and
women in turn
question themselves of the
role of pornography in their relationships (Liechty, 2013). In China, a good
woman is seen as someone who can instantly
relate to a man’s well-being. This can
be attributed to the Mao period
where
the
looks, as well as the
individual, had
no
existence (Johansson, 2013).

References

Chaplin, S. (2013). Interiority and the Modern Woman in Japan. In: S. Munshi, ed., Images of the Modern Woman in Asia: Global Media, Local Meanings. London: Rutledge.

Johansson, P. (2013). Selling the modern woman; Culture and Chines Gender Politics. In: S. Mushi, ed., Images of the Modern Woman in Asia: Global Media, Local Meaning. London: Rutledge.

Liechty, M. (2013). Women and Pornography in Kathmandu: Negotiating the Modern women in a New Consumer Society. In: S. Munshi, ed., Images of the Modern Woman in Asia: Global Media, Local Meaning. London: Rutledge.

Ruby, T. (2004). Immigrant Muslim women and the hijab. Saskatoon, Sask.: Community-University Institute for Social Research.