Image Analysis Essay Example

Image Description:

Image 1 in terms of ambience provides a cool outlook (Kress, 1996). This is because of the use of blue colour of the sea. It also has a light touch of daylight. The photo has a high modality because of the standard coding orientation. This makes the image to be real from the point of view of an asylum seeker. The photo has mixed colour saturation with the blue background of the ocean being prominent. The colour differentiation in the photo is full since one can clearly distinguish between the colours used as a result of a strong contrast. The contact in the image is a vicarious one in the sense that it appears as though we are the ones looking or making contact with the image of the people in the sea. In terms of social distance, the image takes a medium shot one since it is taken from a considerable distance and covers the entire vessel as well as individuals in it. The second vessel the image is also a long shot one as it is taken from a distant angle. In terms of involvement, the image gives a vanishing point perspective with the first vessel appearing larger compared to the other distant vessel that appears smaller. The involvement of the image is an oblique one as a result of the detachment of the photo. The viewer has been given high angle power through the alignment of the vessels from an aerial view.

Figure 2 has a medium-low modality, in terms of a naturalistic coding orientation. While it is a naturalistic photo, it has a very high level of representational detail as the individual contrast are clearly brought out, the chair colour and its distinction from the boat door, high colour differentiation and saturation, since it is a colored photo, with high modulation in the shading of the surfaces and the individuals skin. There is a naturalistic light source probably from the sun as the individuals body parts that are exposed are uniformly illuminated, and depth in terms of the exposed parts like the face, all of which increases the modality in terms of a naturalistic coding orientation. Moreover, there is presence of context, as there is real background, which is the boats surface, and there is no overlapping between the individuals and the boat, hence increasing the modality. The model is presented as being ‘real’. Therefore, the picture stands for a general perspective and sense of realism.

Figure 3 has a high to low modality, in terms of a naturalistic coding orientation (Cantoni, 1997). While it is a naturalistic photo, it has a very high level of representational detail, high colour differentiation and saturation, as the individuals are of a dark tone and they are putting on multicolour clothes, although there is some modulation in the shading of the skin. There is a naturalistic light source, and depth in terms of the whole body illumination, all of which increases the modality in terms of a naturalistic coding orientation. There is an absence of context, and overlapping between the focused individual and the rest of the individuals in the queue, again reducing the modality. There is a faint shade when focusing on objects rather than the main object hence high contrast. The model is presented as being entirely ‘real’.  

Image 4 has a medium modality in terms of the naturalistic coding orientation (Beddow, 1997). The image has a very low level of representation detail this is because no details other than the faint idea of people and buildings as well as natural features can be identified in the image. The photo has medium levels of colour differentiation mainly because it is uses around four colours; blue, white, yellow and beige. In terms of distance, the photo is a close shot one since is provides an up-close range details of the map.

References

Beddow, J. K. (1997). Image analysis sourcebook. Santa Barbara, Calif.: American Universities Science and Technology Press.

Cantoni, V., Levialdi, S., & Roberto, V. (1997). Artificial vision image description, recognition and communication. San Diego: Academic.

Kress, G. R., & Leeuwen, T. (1996). Reading images: the grammar of visual design. London: Routledge.

Kress, G. R., & Leeuwen, T. (2006). Reading images: the grammar of visual design (2nd ed.). London [etc.: Routledge.

Painter, C., & Martin, J. R. (2013). Reading visual narratives: image analysis of children’s picture books. Sheffield, South Yorkshire: Equinox Pub.