Fingerprint Evidence, Unreliable? Essay Example

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    Other
  • Document type:
    Article
  • Level:
    Undergraduate
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  • Words:
    314

2The Maryland Fingerprint Evidence Ruling

Question 1

The case as an adverse impact on the fingerprint evidence arena. The fingerprinting evidence presented at the court by the FBI against Bryan Rose. The defense attorneys, drawing from the misidentification of the Muslim lawyer, Brandon Mayfair by FBI in the 2004 Madrid train bombing that resulted in the death of 191 people. The impact of the case and the ruling of the judge on the fingerprint evidence is the prevention of the use of the fingerprint evidence in the cases. Baltimore for instance, has already been precluded from the use of fingerprint evidence in its cases. Additionally, the case can result in more criminals refuting the use of fingerprint evidence and thus denying the victims of a crime justice because of a single mistake made by the FBI.

Question 2

The case outcome would have been different if the judge found the forensic fingerprinting evidence presented by the FBI valid. The defendant in the case, Bryan Rose would have been sentenced to death. However, following the evidence presented by the defense on the infallibility of the fingerprint evidence, the judge had suspicions in the evidence presented by the FBI, thus making the declaration that the fingerprint evidence were subjective and untested.

Question 3

The consequence of this case on future court cases is that the courts will not rely on fingerprint evidence alone to convict people for crimes. Instead, the courts will use a collection of evidence that link a criminal to a crime. Additionally, with the cases of misidentification and ignorance of the forensic scientists when handling samples collected from the crime scenes, it will be difficult for the forensic scientists to convince the jury to convict criminals on account of fingerprint evidence.

Work Cited

The Crime Lab Report. Many are to Blame for Maryland Judge’s Decision. The Maryland Fingerprint Ruling. 2007, p. 1-3.