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Factors influencing the adoption of Learning Management Systems in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabian Universities Essay Example

  • Category:
    Education
  • Document type:
    Essay
  • Level:
    Masters
  • Page:
    3
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    1532

Attitude toward using LMS

Attitude can be defined as tendency to act in a consistently favourable or unfavourable way with regard to a given phenomenon (Kim, Chun & Song, 2009). It can also be described as a set of tendencies and emotions that have a bearing on the decisions made by an individual in regard to people, objects or ideas (Asiri, Mahmud, Bakar & Ayub, 2012). The impact of the tendencies and emotions that people have towards other people, objects or ideas is that it determines whether people perceive a given phenomenon favourably or unfavourably or whether they will remain neutral towards the phenomenon. According to Asiri et al. (2012), as a variable, attitude consists of three components which include cognition, affection and behaviour. The cognition element comprises an individual’s factual knowledge about an idea, object or person. The affective component embodies a person’s emotional liking or response to an object, a person or an idea. On the other hand, the behavioural component encompasses an individual’s explicit behaviour that is directed toward an object, an idea or a person.

The study of people’s attitudes is important because it helps determine how people perceive objects, other people or ideas. This point is highlighted in Luan and Teo’s (2011) point that “studying attitude is important because it predicts an individual’s response to an object” (p. 48). The same author also notes that attitudes guide behaviour and that favourable attitudes prompt positive reactions to a phenomenon while unfavourable attitudes prompt negative reactions. From the standpoint of technology acceptance, attitude toward use of LMS refers to a prospective or current user’s emotional assessment of the benefits and costs of using the LMS (Luan & Teo, 2011). For instance, lecturers who have negative attitudes toward the use of LMS are unlikely to be in a position to encourage the use of the LMS among students. On the other hand, if lecturers perceive the use of LMS as a strategy that can help them improve their teaching, they are likely to embrace the technology. In the current research, the research participants’ responses which relate to attitude towards Blackboard include points such as: the LMS can help improve the quality of teaching, that it can make dealing with students easier, and the lack of support and encouragement by management.

Ease of use of LMS

With respect to the technology acceptance model, perceived ease of use denotes “the degree to which a person believes that using a particular system would be free of effort” (Davis, 1989, p. 320). This definition is derived from the definition of ease, which means “freedom from difficulty or great effort” (Davis, 1989, p. 320). The implication of this is that with respect to using an LMS, ease of use relates to the amount of effort that users are required to apply in the course of using the LMS. Ideally, this relates to how an individual will assess how easy it is to use the LMS and how easy it is to learn using the particular system. The dimension of ease of use of system is also related to other dimensions. For instance, it has been argued that the perceived ease of use of a system influences people’s intentions to use the system only through how useful the system is or the system’s usefulness (Money & Turner, 2011). This can be interpreted to mean that unless people perceive a given system to be of use to them, the system’s perceived ease of use attribute will not be crucial. Therefore, it can be said that an LMS’s ease of use can be assessed based on how useful the LMS is to the user.

In regard to the findings of the current research, the participants’ responses which relate to perceived ease of use include “ease of use to save time and effort and the accuracy of the collection of student work and achievement”, “easy to work and interact with students”, “easy communication with the students”, the fact that using Blackboard makes it easier for the professor and students to communicate in a formal way, and “ease of communication and access to information”. As noted by the some of the research participants, there are also factors that make it difficult to use Blackboard, which means that to them, using Blackboard required a lot of effort. These factors include: “some software problems”, “technical support delayed the difficulty of use”, “weakness of the system where the frequency of complaints from academics that many of the features on the system do not work”, and “weak technical support” among others.

Usefulness of the LMS

Perceived usefulness can be defined as “the degree to which a person believes that using a particular system would enhance his or her job performance” (Davis, 1989, p. 320). This definition is derived from the meaning of the word “useful”, which is “capable of being used advantageously” (Davis, 1989, p. 320). The implication of the definition of perceived usefulness is that a technology or system can be perceived to be useful if it can be used in such a way that it affords an advantage or benefit to the user. As noted above, there is a relationship between the perceived usefulness of a technology and the ease of use of the same technology. In essence, it can be argued that it is only when people perceive the usefulness of a technology that they can perceive how easy it is to use the same technology and make a decision on whether to use it.

The perceived usefulness of Blackboard can be assessed by looking at the relevance of the technology to a job (in this case teaching/facilitating learning), output quality in terms of the work that is done with the aid of the technology, and demonstrability of the results (Baker, Al-Gahtan & Hubona, 2012). Demonstrability of the results implies how tangible the results achieved using the technology or system are (Baker et al. 2012). Hence, one can look at whether the technology helps make work easier, whether it helps save time, whether it enables users to accomplish more work, whether it improves effectiveness, and so forth (Ashoori, Noorhosseini & Alishiri, 2015). Based on this, the current research participants’ responses that relate to Blackboard’s usefulness include: it is fast and easy and available for students; it helps save on time and effort; it helps in organising the various aspects of the course; and it has effective tools.

Summary of some of the responses

Attitude toward using LMS

Ease of use LMS

Usefulness LMS

  • Blackboard can help improve the quality of teaching

  • It can make dealing with students easier.

  • Although I took a course in it, but I still did not know many details.

  • Perhaps the difficulty of learning.

  • Lack of knowledge.

  • Lack of experience.

  • Increase the burden on the teacher at home.

  • Require time.

  • Ease of use to save time and effort and the accuracy of the collection of student work and achievement

  • Easy to work and interact with students

  • Easy communication with the students

  • The fact that using Blackboard makes it easier for the professor and students communicate in a formal way

  • Ease of communication and access to information

  • some software problems

  • technical support delayed the difficulty of use

  • Weakness of the system where the frequency of complaints from academics that many of the features on the system do not work

  • Weak technical support

  • Easy communication with the students

  • Fast and easy and available for students.

  • Helps save the time and effort

  • Helps in organising the various aspects of the course (by allowing me to post instructions on the conduction of the activities, and allowing online submission of requirements and establishing deadlines). Makes conduction of quizzes and exams easier, faster, and more organised.

  • It keeps record of all teaching activities, texts, announcements, and updates. It helps keep everyone accountable, students and instructors alike.

  • It has effective tools

References

Ashoori, D., Noorhosseini, S.A., & Alishiri, R. (2015). Perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use for adoption technology LCC Card: Case study paddy farmers Northern Iran. Biological Forum – An International Journal, 7(1), 159-162.

Asiri, M.J.S., Mahmud, R., Bakar, K.A. & Ayub, A.F.M. (2012). Factors influencing the use of learning management system in Saudi Arabian higher education: a theoretical framework. Higher Education Studies, 2(2), 125-137.

Baker, E.W., Al-Gahtani. S.S., & Hubona, G.S. (2012). Cultural impacts on acceptance and adoption of information technology in a developing county. In F. B. Tan (Ed.), International comparisons of information communication technologies: Advancing
applications (pp. 54-78). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.

Davis, F.D. (1989). Perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and user acceptance of information technology. MIS Quarterly; 13(3), 319-340.

Kim, Y.J., Chun, J.U., & Song, J. (2009). Investigating the role of attitude in technology acceptance from an attitude strength perspective.
International Journal of Information Management, 29(1), 67-77.

Luan, W.S., & Teo, T. (2011). Student teachers’ acceptance of computer technology: an application of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM).in T. Teo (Ed.), Technology acceptance in education (pp. 43-62). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.

Money, W., & Turner, A. (2007). Knowledge management information technology user acceptance: assessing the applicability of the technology acceptance model. In M.E. Jennex (Ed.), Knowledge management in modern organizations (pp. 233-255). Hershey, PA: Idea Publishing Group.