Extra page for Research higher work pressure, lower job saitsfaction Essay Example

  • Category:
    Management
  • Document type:
    Assignment
  • Level:
    Masters
  • Page:
    2
  • Words:
    1352

Discussion

The hypothesis result was rejected as it was established that there is no negative relationship between high work pressure and job satisfaction variables. As established, a positive relationship can be found between the two variables. A general conclusion, therefore, is that high work pressure leads to lower job satisfaction levels. The link between the two variables is sufficiently supported literature review and three theoretical frameworks reviewed: stress–strain–outcome (SSO) model, Conservation of Resources Theory (COR), and the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model.

When combined with low level of control, they lead to high work pressure.As the results indicate, work pressure is a detrimental emotional and physical response that happens when the job requirements are considered to be stressful due to various repressive conditions or, mental and physical distress, that denote high work pressure. These are caused by the dimensions of time pressure and work overload. The Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model confirms the conception that a mix of high job demands and low job control contribute to job stress, or psychological strain at work. As established in the current study, when there are high work pressures due to low job control and high job demands, what results are low levels of job satisfaction.

The stress–strain–outcome (SSO) model also confirms the findings that there is a relationship among stress, strain, and their consequential impacts. This daring conclusion leads to the assumption that there is a significant link between work pressure and job satisfaction. Indeed, based on the SSO theory, it is clear that a typical workplace stressor like workloads contributes to high work pressure whose eventual outcome is lack of job satisfaction. The findings reinforce the statement that lower job satisfaction is significant indicator of decrease in employee productivity and high work pressures. Job satisfaction, as determined by work conditions, pay and compensation, and job supervision, results from the level of locus of control, time pressure, and work overload at the workplace. Indeed, examining the dimensions of work conditions on job satisfaction such as work conditions, pay and compensation, and job supervision leads to the conclusion that greater level of satisfaction happens when these dimensions are favourable to the employee. In effect, the aforementioned dimensions only serve to reduce employees’ perception of work pressure.

The Conservation of Resources Theory (COT) also validates the results that employees will always strive to achieve things that are of value to them, without which they are likely to experience work stress. As established in the current study, employees aspire for dimensions of work that relieve them from high exhaustion and fatigue, without which they experience low sense of satisfaction. Employees strive for greater reward and pay structures. An exploration into the dimension of pay and compensation reveals that it positively influences job satisfaction when it is favourable. Similarly, greater levels of financial reward improve the employees’ financial status, livelihood, and perception towards work pressure by triggering a greater sense of satisfaction. Again, the dimension of supervision, or locus of control, also comes into play. Here, lower supervision is concerned with the function and status of employees in an organization, combined with their freedom to undertake their roles, or the level of work pressure autonomously. Lower levels of supervision imply higher level of control and consequently greater level of job satisfaction as employees have autonomy to make decisions regarding their lines of work.

Research limitation

The small study sample is a major limitation to the research. For this reason, the results may not be readily generalised to firms globally. The focus on testing of theories or hypothesis made the study to miss out on phenomena occurring than hypothesis and theory generation, hence leading to confirmation bias. Additionally, the knowledge generated is highly abstract in nature or even too general to be directly applied to specific local organisational contexts.

Theoretical Implications

Generally, the study field-tested three theoretical frameworks in an actual organizational setting. The findings have significant theoretical implications for human resource managers and scholars who look improve organizational performance and subsequently increase the productivity level. The results substantiate that low work pressure and high control increase job satisfaction levels, hence generating support for ‘resources’ that both the employees and management value. The findings further indicate reveal that the theoretical frameworks of stress–strain–outcome (SSO) model, Conservation of Resources Theory (COR), and the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model elaborate on the direct and indirect effects of work pressure and level of employee supervision on job satisfaction. Since work pressure is linked to job satisfaction, it underscores the need to restructure/reorganize policies within which work pressure is kept under control.

Contributions of the research

The study will add to the existing knowledge regarding the elements of work pressure, such as workload, and their link and contribution to job satisfaction. To the human resource managers and scholars, the results highlight the significance of work pressure and job satisfaction in addition to its likely effects on organisational productivity. It has also provides empirical evidence supporting the argument that job stressors may be involved in affecting job satisfaction level. In which case, avoiding is key to ensuring high employee satisfaction levels. The study also informs human resource development researchers on the significant aspects of work pressure and job satisfaction processes, their fundamental causes, and consequences. The study strongly indicates that stressors in the workplace may hinder job satisfaction indirectly as it causes dissatisfaction among employees.

Future research recommendations

A longitudinal study wither a bigger sample would need to be undertaken in future, as this would make the results more generalisable or representative of a general population. Additionally, the present study only assumed work pressure as the predictor of employee job satisfaction. In future, additional factors such as role conflict could be used to measure employee job satisfaction.

Further research is also required to identify factors within the workplace like work pressure and job satisfaction as having the potential to affect the motivation for transfer of learning within the workplace. Further research is should be conducted to examine how the link between Work pressure and job satisfaction affect human resource development activities. Future researches also need to re-examine the direct and indirect effects of work pressure on job transfer. It would be significant to field-test this variable using different samples. For instance, multiple samples from varied cultural backgrounds or countries would offer useful insights on how different cultures perceive the relationships between work pressure and job satisfaction. Future research can also focus on exploring the effects of work pressure on counterproductive work behaviours.

Conclusion

An end conclusion is that work pressure leads to lower levels of satisfaction. This also means that employees who experience high work pressure are likely to experience low job satisfaction levels. Accordingly, since there is no negative relationship between high work pressure and job satisfaction variables, it is concluded that there is a positive relationship between the two variables. The link is exemplified by three theories. The Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model points to the assumption that a mix of high job demands and low job control contribute to job stress, or psychological strain at work. For these reasons, high work pressures due to low job control and high job demands leads to low levels of job satisfaction. Conversely, the stress–strain–outcome (SSO) model indicates the relationship among work conditions and work pressure dimensions like job strain and stress and how they impact job satisfaction levels. It confirms the assumption that job satisfaction such as work conditions, pay and compensation, and job supervision leads to the conclusion that greater level of satisfaction happens when these dimensions are favourable to the employee.

The Conservation of Resources Theory (COT) also validates the assumption that employees will always strive to achieve things that are of value to them, without which they are likely to experience work stress. As established, employees aspire for greater reward and pay structures. Similarly, greater levels of financial reward improve the employees’ financial status, livelihood, and perception towards work pressure by triggering a greater sense of satisfaction. Lower levels of supervision imply higher level of control and consequently greater level of job satisfaction as employees have autonomy to make decisions regarding their lines of work.