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Drug trafficking cutting across other trans- national crime. Essay Example

  • Category:
    Other
  • Document type:
    Research Proposal
  • Level:
    Masters
  • Page:
    3
  • Words:
    1677

1Research Design Assessment

RESEARCH DESIGN ASSESSMENT

Drug Trafficking in Northern, Central and Southern America

Date of initial enrollment (October or January cohort):

Supervisor:

RESEARCH DESIGN ASSESSMENT

Drug Trafficking in Northern, Central and Southern America

  1. Proposed research question

Why is there an increase in drug trafficking across nations of North, Central and Southern America, including the Caribbean regions: A critical look at the cause, impact and solutions to illicit drug trafficking worldwide.

  1. Objective of the dissertation

To critically account for the high rate of illicit drug trafficking across these regions, despite the efforts put in place to fight the menace.

  1. Aims of the dissertation

  • To identify the current situation of drug trafficking, including the type of drugs mostly consumed.

  • To unearth the cause of increased drug trafficking across these regions and the world

  • To analyze the social and economic impacts of illicit drug trade

  • To identify steps that are being taken to curb drug trafficking as well as recommending measures to reduce this illicit trade

  1. Dissertation’s position in the existing literature

It is evident that drug abuse trafficking has increased tremendously over the last few decades. One of the most hit regions of the world is the Northern, Central and Southern America as well as the Caribbean regions. There have been efforts carried out by various groups and stakeholders to try to ensure that this menace is reduced if not completely stopped. Further, there has been some views and school of thought that have been brought forth to explain the cause of high rate of illicit drug trafficking.

According to Sherman and Tree (2010), drug trafficking is caused by lack of money in the society especially the young people. This assertion can be partly accepted as drug trafficking is the act of selling as well as distributing substances that are prohibited under drug laws. Statistics indicates that drug trafficking is one of the largest employers globally. Therefore, contending that drug trafficking is practiced at such a high rate due to lack of money is understandable. However, it is not such a convincing and unquestionable answer to this menace.

Further, according to Bunck and Fowler (2012), the high rate of drug trafficking is based on the region, where every part of the world has specific push and pull factors to drug trafficking. A good example is the Mexican case where drug trafficking has taken another direction (Bunck and Fowler 2012). The drug cartels in Mexico are so prevalent with the political agenda (Watt and Zepeda Martínez 2012. Some of them formed gangs that conduct massive killings. According to Kelly and Smith (2005), the cause of such behaviour in relation to drugs can be explained in terms of political angle, though other factors still play a great role.

Failure to ensure that drugs laws of respect nations in these regions has as well been termed as one of the main causes of increased drug trafficking. It is important to note that Latin America is a critical region for the production of drugs and trafficking (Grillo2012). The major distributors cocaine in the world comprises of Peru, Colombia and Bolivia. Meanwhile, Mexico, Central America as well as the Caribbean region has been used for decades as corridors for the transportation of drugs to both America and Europe. There is a great concern that these nations have become lenient in ensuring that laws are followed to the letter.

Other scholars such as Haughton (2011), contend that drug trafficking is high due to varying reasons such as poverty, poor implementation of laws, lack of political will, economic prospects from illicit drug trade, addiction, socialization, among others.

The main aim of this dissertation is to analyse all these possibilities. However, initial findings coincide with Youngers and Rosin (2005), who indicate that the causes of the high rate of drug trafficking across these regions are multifaceted. There is no one single cause of this increase, but these factors are interrelated.

  1. Bibliography

  • .Bribes, bullets, and intimidation: drug trafficking and the law in Central AmericaBunck, J. M., & Fowler, M. R. (2012).

  • . London, Bloomsbury.El Narco : the bloody rise of Mexican drug cartelsGrillo, I. (2012).

  • . Lanham, Rowman & Littlefield Pub. Group. Drugged Out Globalisation and Jamaicas Resilence to Drug TraffickingHaughton, S. A. (2011).

  • . Oxford, ABC-Clio.Illicit trafficking: a reference handbookKelly, R. J., & Smith, E. F. (2005).

  • . Boulder, Colo, Lynne Rienner.Drugs and democracy in Latin America: the impact of U.S. policyYoungers, C. A., & Rosin, E. (2005).

  • . Edina, Minn, ABDO Pub. Drug traffickingSherman, J., & Tree, S. (2010).

  • . London, Zed Books.Drug war Mexico: politics, neoliberalism and violence in the new narcoeconomyWatt, P., & Zepeda Martínez, R. (2012).

  1. Methodology

This dissertation first looks at the literature review that will focus on various aspects, which have been covered in other literature materials. This section will be divided into two, namely secondary and primary source of materials. One of the secondary sources of materials will be from the university library. This will form the main foundation of my research. The focus will be to look at what other scholars have written on the causes, impacts, as well as the recommended solutions. Much emphasis will be put on the latest works by authors and more so those who have concentrated their work on these regions.

The other reliable source will be the Google books, which is an electronic database available online. The database will be helpful in ensuring that what is covered form the school library is merged with materials from this source. This will assist as well in ascertaining any information that might be controversial. The dissertation will as well include various journals that deal with drug trafficking. Journals will be reliable in providing latest information that helps in analysing the trend of drug trafficking.

As far as primary sources are concerned, much of these will come various United Nations body. To be specific various reports from the United Nations International Drug Control Programme (UNDCP) will be consulted. The main aim will be to provide statistics, impacts and steps being taken including policy framework for dealing with drug trafficking in the world. These reports will be sourced online they are available for the public.

Additionally, in order to supplement him above sources, newspapers and magazines as well as s other online sources will be highly consulted. To be specific, the New York Times has been vocal about drug trafficking and thus it will be helpful in providing more insight to the topic. Furthermore, Forbes materials will as well be useful in offering any relevant information about drug trafficking in these regions.

The next step will be to ensure that each of these materials are well analysed to understand the position taken by authors on drug trafficking. A comparison will be made to bring forth the sense of authors of these materials. Diverse views on the subject will as well be highlighted.

The final part of this section will be to provide a summary of the entire literature materials. At this stage, there will be a recap of what will have been discussed and the position of different authors will be provided before a final submission. However, much emphasis will be put on the strengths and logic of every assertion before conclusion.

  1. Structure

  1. Introduction

  2. Overview of drug trafficking trade

  3. Types of illicit drugs in the international markets

  4. Supply chain of illicit drugs

  5. The cause of increased rate of drug trafficking

  6. The social and economic impacts of drug trafficking

  7. Solutions and recommendations on reducing illicit drug trade

  8. Conclusions

  1. Research timetable

Activity

Feedback from supervisor on Research design

Literature search and initial reading

Writing ch.2, and receive supervisory feedback

Writing ch.3, and receive supervisory feedback

Writing ch.4, and receive supervisory feedback

Writing ch.5, and receive supervisory feedback

Writing ch.6, and receive supervisory feedback

Writing ch.7, and receive supervisory feedback

Writing intro. & Conclusion, receive feedback

Writing final draft

References and proof reading

Submit dissertation/ethics paperwork

QUESTION

YES

NO

1

https://ethics.coventry.ac.uk/App/default.aspxI have consulted the ethics documentation located on the university ethics website

X

2

I have discussed the ethics of my proposed research with my supervisor

X

3

I have sought, or will within the next month seek, full ethical approval for my research project.

X

  1. How I intend to utilise the help of my supervisor

I intend to make use of my supervisor by seeking advice when necessary.

In particular, I think a supervisor’s input will be useful on the formulation of fieldwork tools (interview questions, questionnaires, etc.), and by regularly receiving feedback from them with respect to completed written work (this research design, for example, and completed chapters). I understand that I can only ask my supervisor to read one draft of each chapter, but I think this will invaluable for improving the findings of my research. I intend to submit each chapter as it is completed.

I think my supervisor will expect me to undertake the research and writing for my dissertation over a sustained period, and not attempt to do everything in the last couple of months. I doubt if they will be happy to give advice or feedback at the last moment, if little contact has been made prior to this date. Supervisors will only read my chapters if these are submitted at regular intervals, and in good time. It is unlikely they will read a whole dissertation, all at once.

Bibliography

Bribes, bullets, and intimidation: drug trafficking and the Bunck, J. M., & Fowler, M. R. (2012).

.law in Central America

. London, Bloomsbury.El Narco : the bloody rise of Mexican drug cartelsGrillo, I. (2012).

Drugged Out Globalisation and Jamaicas Resilence to Drug Haughton, S. A. (2011).

. Lanham, Rowman & Littlefield Pub. Group. Trafficking

. Oxford, ABC-Clio.Illicit trafficking: a reference handbookKelly, R. J., & Smith, E. F. (2005).

Drugs and democracy in Latin America: the impact of U.S. Youngers, C. A., & Rosin, E. (2005).

. Boulder, Colo, Lynne Rienner.policy

. Edina, Minn, ABDO Pub. Drug traffickingSherman, J., & Tree, S. (2010).

Drug war Mexico: politics, neoliberalism and violence Watt, P., & Zepeda Martínez, R. (2012).

. London, Zed Books.in the new narcoeconomy