Complete order 384090 Essay Example

Group Assignment Cover Sheet

chool of complete order 384090S Management

College of Business and Law

complete order 384090 1

  1. Saud Almalki

  2. Sze Tak, Hui

  3. Fredy Chiriya

  4. Naief Aldawai

Unit Name and Number

Management Skills 200768

Lecturer/Session

Dr Wayne Fallon

Title of Assignment

Group Case Analysis Report

6pm, Friday,2 September- 2011

29-8- 2011

Campus Enrolment

Parramatta

Declaration:

 I hold a copy of this assignment if the original is lost or damaged.

 I hereby certify that no part of this assignment or product has been copied from any other student’s work or from any other source except where due acknowledgement is made in the assignment.

 I hereby certify that no part of this assignment has been submitted by me for any other assessment or if it has that appropriate referencing has been provided.

 No part of the assignment/product has been written/produced for me by any other person except where collaboration has been authorised by the subject lecturer/session concerned

 I am aware that this work may be reproduced and submitted to plagiarism detection software programs for the purpose of detecting possible plagiarism (which may retain a copy on its database for future plagiarism checking)

Signature: ……………………………………………………………………….

Signature: ……………………………………………………………………….

Signature: ……………………………………………………………………….

Signature: ……………………………………………………………………….

Signature: ……………………………………………………………………….

Signature: ……………………………………………………………………….

Note: An examiner or lecturer has the right not to mark this assignment if the above declaration has not been signed)

GROUP CASE ANALYSIS REPORT

complete order 384090 2Melbourne Institute of Technology (Sydney Campus)

    • Saud, Almalki

    • Sze Tak, Hui

    • Fredy, Chiriya

    • Naief, Aldawai

Executive summary

This report focuses on the contemporary issue of the Melbourne Institute of Technology (MIT) Sydney campus, based on information provided by its Academic Manager in face-to-face interviews and other secondary sources. First presented in the report is the background of MIT followed by the methodology and data collection. It further reviews and discusses the contemporary issue in the context of management skills of the Academic Manager himself, the senior management team of the Sydney campus, and executive management of the organization in head office.

The main findings in this report include inadequate preparation before implementation of major changes due to macro-environmental forces, inadequate management skills, lack of communication, responsibility without authority due to lack of empowerment and delegation, and insufficient resources. An analysis of these findings is included followed by recommendations put forward to possibly improve the organization and its managers. A key recommendation is the introduction of a balanced scorecard (BSC) as a strategic management tool in conjunction with several others.

Table of Contents

Executive summary…………………………………………………………………………………………2

Introduction/Background……………………………………………………………………………….4

Methodology and data collection methods……………………………………………………….5

The contemporary issue………………………………………………………………………………….6

Analysis and implications for managers’ skills………………………………………………….7

Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………………………………….10

Recommendation………………………………………………………………………………………….11

References……………………………………………………………………………………………………12

Appendices…………………………………………………………………………………………………..13

Introduction and Background

The focus of this report is on Melbourne Institute of Technology (MIT) which was established in the mid 1990’s. The college is one of the leading private higher-education providers in Australia. The main campus of MIT is in Melbourne and the Sydney campus is located in the Sydney CBD next to the Darling Harbour.

With a motto of “Practical Excellence”, MIT emphasizes on high quality education service. According to the chairman, Professor John Rickard (2011), the school focuses on issues and challenges that students are facing, professionally provides courses in different areas, supported by first class facilities, smaller class sizes, caring teaching staffs and comprehensive student support services. Besides, in the description of the school, he mentioned that the ultimate goal for MIT is to become a university college.

Under the governance of the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, MIT works in association with The University of Ballarat. The University designs the courses and issues the qualifications while MIT provides the facilities and lecturers. Since 2010, the MIT Sydney campus started to offer a diploma in information technology under its own name. (MIT, 2011)

Methodology and data collection methods

Research for this report was through a mix of primary and secondary sources. The primary data sources included two interviews with the Academic Manager of the MIT Sydney campus. He is a key senior manager who presides over the MIT Sydney Language Centre (MITSLC) and holds the responsibility of its

day-to-day operational and management matters.

The first preliminary interview was conducted on the 23th July, 2011 as a pilot with a questionnaire to know more about the operations of the organization and brief understanding of its contemporary issues, whilst building rapport. This helped in setting up questions for the second and formal interview conducted on the 6th August with all group members present.

Our group researched for different secondary sources through the internet on the MIT and University of Ballarat official websites, textbooks and journals. We relied on such information to clarify and support our point of view, as well as come up with suitable recommendations for the organization.

The contemporary issue:

According to the MIT Academic Manager, the contemporary issue of the organization is ‘change in product demand’. A decreasing number in student enrolment has been recorded in recent years, especially for overseas students. He believes that the problem is lead by three major causes, including changes in immigration policies, high exchange rate of Australian dollar and industrial problems in the education industry in general.

Based on feedback from his students, the manager stated that stricter requirements for overseas graduates to apply for residence makes some overseas students no longer interested in studying in Australia. Thus, he also believes that the dramatic increase of Australian dollar further affects students’ preferences and shifted some potential students to other countries. Recent figures in the media, the Economic Times (2010) confirm this view. Global student visa applications to Australia in 2010 have fallen by over 18% compared to the record figures of the previous year.

It was his view that industry-wide problems in the education industry have also contributed to the challenges. He mentioned that in the last few years a number of private colleges closed down due to bankruptcy or poor management. Some colleges had been discovered with serious misconducts which included illegally providing certificates to students and corruption. In the manager’s point of view, these so-called “rogue schools” had badly damaged the reputation of the Australian education industry.

Facing to the contemporary issue, the manager admitted that the power of control over the problem for the organization is very limited. And he also said that there were uncertainties about the foreseeable future. In response to the problem, he believed that it was important for MIT to ensure they continually improved the quality of their services. A good reputation would help in keeping MIT’s student retention rate, and attract domestic students.

In recent times MIT has arranged different programs and strategies for students to improve their academic performance. Thus, the school changed their logo to promote a vision of “practical excellence”.

Findings and skills analysis

From the interviews conducted, a number of management skills challenges were identified which account for the symptoms being faced by the campus. Some of the symptoms go beyond the Sydney campus back to the head office in Melbourne. The following management skills were identified. A brief analysis of these also follows with the view to formulate recommendations to possibly overcome the shortcomings.

Change management and management of change.

It was identified during the interview and also confirming the information on the college website that the college was undergoing a massive change process. However, it was apparent that there was incoherent change management process which made management of change quite a challenge. It is required that before embarking on a process of change, a gap analysis be conducted so as to create readiness by identifying the current situation and formulate a pathway to the destined vision outcome. From this goals are set so as to ensure commitment is obtained from all stakeholders. The commitment obtained in advance enables ongoing assessment, evaluation and appraisal in performance measurement against the set goals. The strategy to implement change should further be communicated with assurances to affected stakeholders in such a way as to create a positive climate so that all stakeholders are motivated to pursue the vision towards the desired outcome (Carlopio and Andrewarthar 2008)

It was our finding that the MIT head office had conducted surveys which enabled a gap analysis to create readiness. However, according to the manager, the management at the Sydney campus was not involved in the process. As a result there was no clear vision and goals passed on to the campus staff even though it was well documented on the MIT website. This was a major flow on management skills by the Campus Director and the senior management at head office level. Therefore the change process was taking a natural course instead of a strategically planned course.

Leadership skills

Leadership differs from management in knowing the right things to do apart from doing things right (Carlopio and Andrewartha 2008). This requires a clear sense of direction. However, the management team did not have the skills to lead in pursuit of the vision of ‘practical excellence’ especially in the absence of the Campus Director who was always away on overseas trips to expand the business. As a result some major decisions were often deferred to head office in Melbourne as there was no one on the ground in Sydney campus to lead the management team when needed. The managers did not appear to have the skills to take any innovative decisions for the success of the organization as they had not been trained to do so.

Communication skills

There seemed to be gross lack of communication at all management levels. While the MIT website had details of the 2010 survey conducted by the head office, the goals formulated from their findings, and also reference to reasons for the change of logo, the senior managers at the Sydney campus were not aware of these initiatives. They were only involved in selecting by vote their preferred logo among three presented from head office. As to why the logo was changed they were not aware as they were not informed. While the Campus Director was fully aware as a direct report to the CEO, no information was passed down to the senior managers in Sydney. While it is the duty of management to maintain timely workplace communication, especially in a process of change, both the CEO at MIT head office and the Sydney Campus Director lacked these skills in a dysfunctional way (Carlopio Andrewartha 2008; Moyer and Dunphy 2007; Timmins 2011)

Self-awareness and emotional intelligence skills

It was found that the manager interviewed was fully aware of the skills he needed which he lacked. He acknowledged that he lacked experience, change management and leadership skills to stir the team towards the vision of MIT in the absence of the Campus Director. However, he was fully convinced and even disappointed that his colleagues were not aware of their weaknesses and management skills which they lacked. This cast doubt in his mind whether this situation could be resolved early enough to achieve the college goal of practical excellence. Self-awareness is the pre-requisite to building emotional intelligence which makes effective leadership possible (Carlopio and Andrewartha 2008; Latif 2004). From the goings on at the Sydney campus, it can be concluded that the MIT CEO at head office and all his senior managers lack self-awareness and the emotional intelligence to perceive the needs of the organization’s employees, so the employees were not prepared for the change process they are going through. Emotional intelligence skills would enable them to manage workplace stress (Ramesar, Koortzen and Oosthuizen 2009).

Empowerment/delegation and team-building skills

It was found that some decisions were arrived at by team discussion in the absence of the Campus Director. Due to lack of delegated authority on any nominee of the campus, major decisions are sometimes delayed. The management team is still at storming stage, always failing to agree on simple operational matters and deferring to HO for endorsement. The campus Director lacks the effective delegation and empowerment skills. The managers also are demoralized as they perceive lack of trust by the executive (Carlopio and Andrewartha 2008; Fard, Ghatari and Hasiri 2010).

They are stressed and lack adequate resources to do perform their duties effectively. They have responsibility without authority to make changes when needed especially when facing seasonal enrolment pressures. They wished they could hire casual staff during peak periods but lacked the budget and power to do so in a top-down structured private enterprise. The executive management at MIT HO together with the Campus Director lack team-building skills due to lack of trust, coaching and counseling of staff experiencing stress due to lack of resources and direction.

Dispute resolution skills

In the absence of a clear direction and resources, staff morale slumps low. As a result, disputes are unavoidable. It was our finding that disputes were common at the Sydney Campus. However, due to lack of dispute resolution and interviewing skills, the senior managers resorted to use of avoidance and compromise techniques as preferred methods of settling issues. The lack of supportive communication skills results in high turnover of lecturers (Carlopio and Andrewartha 2008). Most conflicts are attributed to poor communication (Moyer and Dunphy 2007) as a collaborative work environment was not ensured (Carlopio and Andrewartha 2008).

Conclusion

To sum up, the contemporary issue faced by MIT Sydney Campus had symptoms emanating from macro-environmental forces beyond the resources of the organization as well as lack of management skills. On the other hand, inadequate resources were a major issue contributing to the symptoms. These needed executive management to resolve by supplying needed financial resources and manpower for the efficient running of the college thereby boosting staff morale. In addition, the continued absence of the Campus Director led to inefficiency in the running of the Campus due to delays in implementation of some major changes which needed adjustment from time to time. Delegation of authority to local senior management would improve efficiency. It is clear that there is room for improvement for better management of the MIT institute. To this end the recommendations offered in this report will assist in overcoming the current symptoms and also help re-shape the organizational culture towards its goals.

For this report, our group was pleased that the interviewee was openhearted to our questions, as we were able to get more information in detail. However, some of our questions could not be fully answered due to policy concerns. While we got quality information, a limitation of the research was that there was no access to interview the executive management from MIT head office in Melbourne who make the major decisions. A more balanced view could also be achieved if we had secured access to interview more managers at the Sydney Campus. We suspect that the contemporary issue of reduced enrolments could possibly also relate to poor management apart from the external forces.

Recommendations

From the gaps observed in the management skills outlined above we propose the following be considered by the Board of Directors in order to overcome the symptoms observed as a sign of lack of management skills. Once implemented we hope MIT will be a more successful organization with a competitive edge in the education industry.

Improve Communication

The institution should make use of communication so as to create cohesion in it. It was noted that the ongoing survey was not unknown to many managers and also the change of logo. The institution should make use of:

Intranet- it is the communication within the institution’s network. It ensures that information reaches every department in the institution.

Emails – emails concerning specific information should be sent to the target people. For instance a common message on the study should have been sent to the managers.

Memos – memos are normally placed on the notice boards or sent via intranet as emails for all to see. In so doing, all the stake holders will be able to get full knowledge of what is happening.

Workshops

Workshops addressing the following should be conducted:

Self awareness – this would enable the management staff to know their weaknesses hence know how to deal with them.

Reflection – this will facilitate the seeking of help on weaknesses identified after self awareness. For instance the manager knew his weaknesses but had done nothing about it.

Emotional intelligence – this would ensure that the management has the skills and knowledge of how to deal with employees and integrate them into the policies and objectives of the institution.

Interview skills – this will ensure that the managers have the skills to talk to their teams and employees and be able to guide them towards making decisions within the confinement of the objectives of the institution.

Dispute resolution – the management of the school does not have the right skills and approach while dealing with disputes among its employees. Dispute resolution skills will enable the management create harmony and peaceful coexistence among the workers.

Organizational restructure

Empowerment – the managers and employees of the school should be provided with the right materials in order to perform their responsibilities well. This includes hiring of extra staff during peak seasons like admissions. In so doing the current staff would not be overworked hence will provide quality services. This will also reverse the demoralized spirit of the managers and the employees.

Delegation – this will ensure that important decisions are not delayed as a result of waiting for individuals to perform certain duties as it is the case in the institution. In so doing, the institution will not rely on the head office which is certainly busy to make for them every decision. Delegation ensures that tasks and responsibilities are shared among the managers. Delegation will also make the managers get confidence on the executive management of the institution since decisions and policies will be made with their input and also faster.

Balanced Scorecard for organizational modernization

When people lack management skills symptoms of lack of direction emerge. For the MIT Sydney Campus, this is blamed on the absentee Campus Director. We recommend that a balanced scorecard (BSC) be developed for the campus. However, a total company approach where the BSC is developed at head office level would be more preferable.

The BSC concept has evolved over the years to provide guidance as a strategic management tool for modern businesses. It is no longer limited to financial performance measurement in the traditional sense, but instead, it has become an operating system and an organizing framework which focuses the entire organization on strategy (Kaplan and Norton 2001; Barnabe’ 2011). The BSC would enable MIT better project and communicate its vision of ‘practical excellence’ and its mission, values, and goals thereby reshaping the organizational culture based on trust, redefine its relationships with its stakeholders, reengineer its business processes, re-skill its workforce, and enhance teamwork in a time of the major change it is engulfed in (Kaplan and Norton 2001; Duren 2010)

The BSC concept has been successfully implemented to drive change with exceptional financial and operational results in many education institutions, for instance in India Universities (Umashankar and Dutta 2007) and also universities in London (Philbin 2011). There is also extensive literature on the deployment of BSC in aligning change management (Jayashree and Hussain 2011) as the BSC focuses change efforts (Kaplan and Norton 1996). The BSC approach would benefit MIT as it forges ahead.

Significant benefits were realized in a single faculty at the University of Newcastle in NSW when the Faculty of Health implemented a BSC in 2003 independent of the university’s strategic plan, focusing on their students and communities, financial sustainability and accountability, internal processes, their partners and re-skilling of their workforce for growth and innovation (Chan 2009). MIT would realize similar benefits as all these other universities and institutions worldwide across many industries, including the public sector and not-for-profit organizations.

Implementing a BSC would free the MIT Campus Director to develop the business while senior managers in Sydney get guidance to pursue ‘practical excellence’ without waiting for the absentee decision maker as they would be better equipped to make decisions, managing change within a strategically designed change management framework and enjoy success like the academic institutions cited above.

References

Barnabe’ (2011), A “system dynamics-based Balanced Scorecard” to support strategic decision making: Insights for a case study. International Journal of productivity and Performance Management, 60 (5) pp. 446-473

Carlopio and Andrewartha (2008), Developing management skills: a comprehensive guide for leaders, 4th edn, Pearson Education Australia, Frenchs Forest.

Chan (2009), How strategy map works for Ontario’s health system. International Journal of Public Sector Management, 22 (4) pp.349-363

Duren (2010), Public management means strategic management: How can libraries fulfill the requirements of the new public management? Library Management, 31 (3) p.162-168.

Fard,Ghatari and Hasiri (2010), employees Morale in Public Sector: Is Organizational Trust an important factor. European Journal of Scientific research, 46 (3) pp.378-390.

Jayashree and Hussain (2011), Aligning change deployment: a Balanced Scorecard approach. Practitioner Paper. Measuring Business Excellence, 15 (3) pp. 63-85

Kaplan and Norton (1996) , Linking the Balanced Scorecard to Strategy. California Management Review , 39 (1) pp. 53-79

Kaplan and Norton (2001) , Transforming the Balanced Scorecard from Performance Measurement to Strategic Management: Part 1. American Accounting Association. Accounting Horizons , 15 (1) pp.87-104

Latif (2004), Using Emotional intelligence in the Planning and Implementation of a Management Skills Course. Pharmacy Education ,4 (2) pp. 81-89.

Moyer and Dunphy (2007), Conflict management. Part 1: Unproductive conflict. Pharmaceutical Representative www.pharmrep.com, p.38.

Philbin (2011), Design and implementation of the Balanced Scorecard at a university institute. Measuring Business Excellence 15(3) pp. 34-45.

Ramesar, Koortzen and Oosthuizen (2009), The relationship between emotional intelligence and stress management. sA Journal of Industrial Psychology, 35 (1) Art # 443: pp. 39-48.

Timmins (2011), Manager’s duty to maintain good workplace communication skill. Nursing management, 18 (3) pp.30-34.

Umashankar and Dutta (2007), Balanced scorecards in managing high education institutions: an Indian perspective. International Journal of Educational Management, 21 (1) pp. 54-67.

GROUP CASE ANALYSIS REPORT Page 17