Combating learning anxieties: practical implications for teachers Essay Example

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    Undergraduate
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4LEARNING ANXIETY

Learning Anxiety

Affiliation

Learning Anxiety

Learning
anxieties are fears that are associated with learning and
they are characterized with nervousness, worry
and unease about education
or
learning
new
things. According to Jean Piaget (1896-1980) theory of intellectual
development, children
learning
take
place in stages
and
experiences are paramount in determining
what
children will incorporate. If a child is exposed to anxiety
and
negative
experience he
or
she will develop
anxiety. Anxiety
usually
describes
accurately
the
feeling that can be shared by learners in their early
stages
especially
when
they
want to approach a new
challenge. In some
cases, the
feelings
usually
linger
long after the
beginning and
it
ultimately
becomes a long-term struggle. For
instance, a child may develop
learning
anxiety
when a teacher
or fellow students mocks him or her and convinces him or her that he
knows
nothing
and can’t afford to learn in the
right
way. It is worth
noting
that
anxieties
are not only
manifested in children, but
also
adults
do
exhibit
the
cases of anxiety and
if not corrected, they can impair
learning at a great
extent. The
anxiety may be affiliates of prior
learning
experiences (Ghinassi, 2010).

Learning
anxieties may be manifested
differently amongst learners, but
the
most
obvious is withdrawal. Students
withdraw from learning
completely
and at times
they may drop out of school. Learning
anxiety is an invisible
disability in learning
and at times
it
affects
learning negatively. It
affects
the
students
working
memory
making
it
very
hard to learn
and
maintain
the
information. Students
who are anxious
usually
think
less
compared to the
students
who are not anxious
hence
altering
the
capability of learning in a child
or
even an adult (Ghinassi, (2010).

Teachers are the
immediate
causes of learning
anxiety and
they
also
turn out to be immediate
solutions
for
learning
anxieties. As
posited
above, learning
anxiety is caused by lack of self-esteem
and
fear of failure. For
instance,
fear of failure can contribute to anxiety
especially
when a teacher
punishes a student
because
he has failed.
The
punishment may lead to the
development of anxiety. The
student will always
avoid
answering
questions in class
because
he will be punished. At some
cases, the
student will even
sweat upon seeing
the
teacher
because
he
associates him or her with punishment. Such
cases will ultimately
lead to escalated levels of anxiety. In an attempt to avoid
such
occurrences, the
teacher should not apply
negative feedback mechanism in case a student
fails
or
does not get a question
right. The tutor or the mentor should congratulate
the
child on trying
and
encourage him or her that
he will score
better
next
time. Such
practices will erase
the
fear that is associated
anxiety
and
ultimately
face out anxiety. Vygotsky’s (1896-1934) asserts
that
the
society
contributes to individual
development
and
therefore, the
school
society can contribute to the
development of anxiety
and at the
same
time
reduce
cases of anxiety (Onwuegbuzie, Bailey & Daley, 2000).

Classroom management
for
the
teacher is paramount in trying to stop
cases of anxiety. For
instance, the
teachers should not scold
students
when
they
fail to perform
well. Instead, he
or
she should ensure
that
students are motivated through the
use
positive feedback mechanisms
and
ultimately
deterring
the
occurrence of the
cases of anxiety.
Such
practices will ultimately
lead to advanced
cases of professionalism and as Vygotsky and Piaget asserts
no
negative
experience
affect
the
child. Classroom should be a place
where
each
and
every
individual
yearns to be and through that
it will be possible to stamp out anxiety (Lyons, Ford, & Kelly, 2010).).

References

Ghinassi, C. W. (2010). Anxiety. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Greenwood/ABC-CLIO.

Onwuegbuzie, A. J., Bailey, P., & Daley, C. E. (2000). The Validation Of Three Scales Measuring Anxiety At Different Stages Of The Foreign Language Learning Process: The Input Anxiety Scale, The Processing Anxiety Scale, And The Output Anxiety Scale. Language Learning, 50(1), 87-117.

Lyons, G., Ford, M., & Kelly, M. (2010). Classroom management. South Melbourne, Vic.: Cengage Learning.