Class:

3Technology Transfer Programme in NASA

Technology Transfer Programme in NASA

Technology Transfer Programme in NASA

The aim of Technology Transfer System at NASA is to reduce the cost of operation and increase efficiency in various sectors (Hunsucker, Brah, & Santos, 1989, 38). With the its Early Detection of Breast Cancer programme, NASA aim at advancing the imaging sensors and processing technologies which it considers vital for commercialization. NASA identified early detection of breast cancer through advanced imaging technologies and set it a priority as it is the leading cause of death among women. The agency focused on the development of cancer imaging technologies since the technology used has several similarities with those of the agency including the fine resolution, brightness magnitude, and sensitivity to low level of lights (Schmidt, Frey, Vernikos, & Winfield, 1996, 2111). Besides, organizations are transiting from the R&D to operational environment though human resources are resisting such changes. Through using NASA’s Space Shuttle programme, the organizations are able to plan the transition effectively (Hunsucker, Brah, & Santos, 1989). With such, NASA’s concerns on transition are the cultural and political aspects. However, to such end, it is unclear if NASA understands the significant differences between R&D and operations. To accommodate the scalability and flexibility of its operations, NASA developed a private cloud known as the XML Datastore (XD), which uses as the foundation of providing the Software as a Service (SaaS) framework (Maluf, Gurram, & Okimura, 2012). Through technology transfer system, NASA aims at eliminating the need of installing independently stove piped applications by each of its centres. Moreover, such processes ensure alleviation of the burden associated with maintenance of software, ongoing operations, and supporting each of the centres. NASA also utilizes and benefits from the Grid XML Datastore Framework (GXD Framework) which is an open and extensible database architecture supporting the efficient and flexible integration of the heterogeneous and distributed information resources (Maluf, Gurram, & Okimura, 2012).

Reference

Hunsucker, J. L., Brah, S. A., & Santos, D. L. (1989). How NASA moved from R & D to operations. Long Range Planning, 22(6), 38-47. doi:10.1016/0024-6301(89)90100-3

Maluf, D., Gurram, M., & Okimura, T. (2012). NASA Technology Transfer System: Under the hood. 2012 IEEE Aerospace Conference, 111-117. doi:10.1109/aero.2012.6187422

Maluf, D., Gurram, M., & Okimura, T. (2012). NASA Technology Transfer System: Under the hood. 2012 IEEE Aerospace Conference, 1-6. doi:10.1109/aero.2012.6187422

Schmidt, G., Frey, M., Vernikos, J., & Winfield, D. (1996). NASA’s technology transfer program for the early detection of breast cancer. Proceedings of 18th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2111-2112. doi:10.1109/iembs.1996.646457