Analysis of Young Adults Living Alone Essay Example

  • Category:
    Education
  • Document type:
    Assignment
  • Level:
    Undergraduate
  • Page:
    1
  • Words:
    321

Research has been done on the reasons that drive young people, especially in their early twenties to live on their own. However, the concept of wanting to live alone may be a representation of a challenge in the family and the relationship of the heterosexual couples. The hopes and expectations of the young adults about relationships have been analyzed, so as to determine whether the young adult’s descents being a couple, or being in a couple relationship is not a priority. According to Arnett (2000,p.469), living alone is a phase of life commonly referred to as early adulthood, where individuals spend time in their education, in developing their careers where they explore different paths in life before settling down with their partners and having children.

The need to explore and experience independence as part of a stage in life is connected to the argument that living alone may coincide with the notions of love and often a search for a soul mate. Hence, the lifestyle of living alone for the young adults may not necessarily be a challenge to the married coupled and relationships but it is a way of maintaining the ideal associated with the heterosexual couples.

In the phase of life of wanting to live alone most individual do have resources to live in an independent life but do not partake the responsibility of having to cater for the children (Arnett2000, p.469). Hence, the young adults focus on establishing an unknown identity. With regard to the argument, after the completion of the life phase, the young adults eventually perceive marriage as a central goal in life and failure to have a life partner leaves a gap in the individual’s life. Therefore, living alone is a phase of life which is dynamic and after completion; the young adults get into marriage.

References

Arnett, J.J., 2000. Emerging adulthood: A theory of development from the late teens through the twenties. American psychologist55(5), p.469.