Building Management System Essay Example

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10Building Management System

Building Management System

Abstract

This report discusses the integration and cooperation that exist between the security manager and facility manager in enhancing the security and safety and administration of a facility. Current facility managers and security managers must appreciate each other’s role in regard to managing a facility as well as technologies applied in a typical high rise building criteria. Facility managers and security managers have roles and responsibilities that are overlapping in many ways. Security managers and facility managers have to work together in facilitating security and safety in all areas within building, lighting, HVAC, across controls, fire and safety, and lifts. The work of the security manager is enhanced by the cooperation with the facility manager. The facility manager provides the administration part while the security manager ensures that the security loopholes are sealed to avoid incidents and accidents. In case of incidents the facility manager and security manager have to work together to ensure safety evacuation of the occupants.

Introduction

Current facility managers and security managers have to appreciate each other’s roles and responsibility with regard to managing a facility as well as technologies that are applied in a typical high rise building criteria. The safety and security of a facility or an organization depends on the cooperation and integration of the facility and security management function of the institution (Goldman, 2006). Facility managers and security managers have roles and responsibilities that are overlapping and need each other’s support to attain a safe workplace environment. Current facility managers are in charge of coordinating the physical workplace applying business administration, behavioral science as well as engineering. Facilities have to provide positive influence and align to productivity to be fit for purpose hence the functions of facility managers and security managers have to be supported. Facility management works across other disciplines like general management, engineering, architecture and construction in achieving the objectives of a certain project (Blyth, 2008). Safety and security of an organization can only be achieved if security managers are supported by facility managers in charge of the facility. This paper argues that facility managers and security managers have to embrace each other’s role and appreciate their independent contribution to the stability, administration, safety and security of the organization or facility.

Discussion

Security managers and facility managers have to work together in facilitating security and safety in all areas within building, lighting, HVAC, across controls, fire and safety, and lifts. Facility management is separate from security management but both functions enjoy a strong relationship that has overlapping roles as well as responsibilities. There is no one distinct mode of operation, however, the extent to which these functions operate will be defined by the organization itself. With regard to security it is imperative for facility management to operate at the tactical, strategic and operational level that requires working with the security manager at all levels
(Blyth, 2008). It has been said that facility management describes a major knowledge domain which supports security management. When managing a facility both the facility administration and security personnel have to work hand in hand in order to achieve the desired results. ISOs are needed to have some level of technical competence in leading their organization’s security initiatives. The safety and security of a facility depends on how well the facility manager coordinates with the security manager in the implementation of security initiatives and programs. Strategic security goals have to be worked out between the two functions of the organization (Analoui, 2007). Both facility managers and security managers have an important role to play in the facility’s risk assessment or when it comes to technologies used in typical high rise building criteria.

Facility management can be described as the practice in the coordination of physical workplace as the foundation of business administration, engineering and behavioural sciences. Facility management can be simplified to refer to the management of both non-vital and vital infrastructure as well as assets of facilities of an organization. Facility management has the role of integrating into a single management responsibility various job functions that have been traditionally handled in uncoordinated manner by various groups, departments or individuals. Facility management results into a business practice of planning, managing and providing a work environment that is productive (Blyth, 2008). Despite dealing with the practical elements of cost as well as efficiencies, facility management touches on a special aspect within the working environment that can be described as the quality of life. Facility management involves all activities that regards to keeping a complex operating. Facility managers offer management services as well as processes which support the core business of any organization. They make sure that an organization attains the most suitable working environment for its employees together with other activities. The duties of facility managers may vary according to the nature of the organization, however, they generally focus of employing best business practice in improving efficiency through the reduction of operating costs while at the same time increasing productivity (Smith & Brooks, 2013). This is a huge field having a diverse range of responsibilities that are defined by the size and structure of the organization. Facility managers get involved in the both daily operations as well as strategic planning especially with regard to premises and buildings.

Both security professionals and facility managers have shared responsibilities that have to be spelt out within their operations. Consequently modern facility managers and security managers have to appreciate each other’s roles and responsibilities for the benefit of the project or the organization they are working for. It is important for security personnel and facility managers to understand that life safety systems in the course of conducting a security survey that safety and security can hardly be separated (BDO, 2012). There is also the need to understand life safety systems when designing security systems like access control. Security managers and facility managers have to integrate in their roles when it comes to creating a suitable working environment for the organization. Current roles and responsibilities of facility managers involve maintenance of the integrity of the building service in the facility as well as maximize return on investment for the building owners. Security professional on the other hand have to understand life operation, emergency warning systems, fire protection systems, building evacuation systems, lighting, building codes and standards. Current facility management role is cross disciplined and business focused. Security personnel evaluate, develop, and implement security program direction and policy (Challinger, 2011). They come up with classification guidance and make original classification and upgrading decisions. Security administration is an integral and specialized element of agency programs and missions. It entails the identification of the need for protection and security, developing as well as maintaining the physical means that are employed for protection and security; developing, maintaining and implementing procedural and technical methods to enhance physical protection, assessment of reliability, suitability, loyalty, and trustworthiness of the people who have access to sensitive or classified resources, information, and material which can compromise security (Sennewald, 2011).

Security management function provides guidance to organization senior managers and leaders through issues that have to consider when coming up with a security policy that is effective and implementing it using a security program. Security managers discuss the team and individual security roles as well as their interrelationship with operational functions. Security personnel further review tactics and best practices that are needed to enhance staff awareness as well as ensure continuous improvement (Booty, 2009). Security managers have to work closely with facility managers for the success of the organization. Security managers are in charge of evaluation, resolution as well as maintenance of security requirements that are effective within an organization. The security manager leads the organization in the development of effective strategies for the identification of the most crucial requirements in the development of an environment that is secure (Atkin & Brooks, 2015). The security manager leads the organization in the identification of security issues as well as the management of identified risks; responding to security incidents, and identifying as well as documenting business-focused security rules.

Facility and security managers have to work together in the design and implementation of a security system when it comes to the various technologies that are used within a typical high rise building criteria. Compartmenting often aids the control of heat and smoke through technical and physical barriers (Duggan, 1992). The capability of area to be separated with passive fire resistant materials as well as supported by active pressurization is a crucial element in the fire life safety. Security managers cannot achieve this security measures without working together with facility managers who are in charge of the entire project and can offer strategic guidance (Barrett & Baldry, 2003). The control of heat and smoke within a high rise building will help in preventing personnel evacuating the facility from being disoriented in anyway. It also reduces damage by smoke and helps the fire fighters in getting the source of fire. Heat and smoke control as well as release systems are located at strategic points throughout a building as well as are important consideration in facility design. A security leader of a facility has to be respected regardless of size (Alder, 2005). The leader has to have a clear grasp of the technical security of issues that affect it in order to gain the respect. Without a clear knowledge of the technical part is difficult to gain respect.

Security management entails developing a security-conscious organizational culture, coming up with tangible procedures that can support security, and management of the various aspects that make up the system. The security manager has to ensure that both the staff and administration are aware of their security roles, aid security efforts, and are able to tolerate small inconveniences that are unavoidable as a part of the system change and improvement. The facility manager has to work together with the security manager to ensure safety and security of the organization (Craighead, 2009). Effective system security demands the creation of a workplace environment as well as an organizational structure whereby the management fully supports and understands security efforts, and the users are encouraged to exercise caution. Security managers and facility managers have to complement each other in their roles and responsibilities for the success of the organization. Both facility managers and security managers have to come up with strategic goals for achieving a suitable working environment where security and safety is not compromised in any way. A security manager has the role of communicating to staff members that protecting the security system is not only in the interests of the organization but also in the best interests of the workers (Muret, 2006). The security managers has to enhance staff awareness of security issues, offer suitable staff security training, and monitor user activity in order to evaluate security implementation. Current security managers and facility managers have roles and responsibilities that are overlapping and one function cannot be divorced from the other completely.

Conclusion

Facility managers and security managers have to support each other in order to attain a safe and secure workplace environment within a facility. The facility manager has a bigger role to play in the management of a facility and technologies that are used within a high rise building in the strategic planning. However, the facility manager cannot do anything with regard safety and security without consulting the security manager. The security manager has to be involved in the design of program and initiatives that will enhance safety and security of a facility. While the facility manager provides the administration role and guidance, the security manager provides the technical expertise in the development, implementation and evaluation of safety measures. Current facility managers have a bigger role to play in ensuring the safety and security of a facility. Security managers have to communicate their plans to the facility administration and give guidance on measures that will improve the general security of a facility. Facility managers have to liaise with security managers in developing strategic and short-term safety and security goals for any organization. Security managers have to communicate any information that will enhance security and safety of the facility. Facility managers have to ensure that this information reaches everybody in good time.

References

Alder, S. (2005). Disaster and Recovery Planning: A Guide for Facility Managers, New York: Security Management.

Analoui, F. (2007). Strategic Human Resource Management, Thomson Learning, London.

Atkin, B. & Brooks, A. (2015). Total Facility Management, Fourth edition, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Barrett, P.S. & Baldry, D. (2003). Facilities Management: Towards Best Practice, Second edition, Oxford: Blackwell Science.

Blyth, M. (2008). Risk and Security Management: Protecting People and Sites Worldwide, London: John Wiley & Sons.

Booty, F. (ed.) (2009). Facilities management handbook, Fourth edition, Oxford: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann.

BDO (2012), Facility Management, UK: Overview.

Challinger, D. (2011). From the Ground up: Security for Tall Buildings, Crisp Report, ASIS International.

Craighead, G. (2009). High-rise Security and Fire Life Safety (3rd ed.). Burlington, MA: Elsevier.

Duggan, V.J. (1992). Chemistry of Fire, Unpublished manuscript, Perth: Western Australia.

Goldman, A.J., (2006). Optimal facility-location, Journal of Research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology 111 (2), 97–101.

Muret, D. (2006). Staying on guard, Street & Smith’s Sports Business Journal 43 (8).

Sennewald, C.A. (2011), Effective Security Management, London: Elsevier.

Smith, C.L., & Brooks, D. J. (2013). Security Science: The Theory and Practice of Security, Waltham, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann.