Assessment

Post1 Reply

It was unfortunate that you had to undergo such discrimination in your workplace. In a study conducted (Boone-James, McKechnie, Swanberg, & Besen, 2013) to ascertain the relationship that exists between employee perceptions of unfair treatment of older workers and employee engagement, it was found out that the perceived discrimination was construed to lower levels of employee engagement amongst workers irrespective of age. In fact, other research study indicated that for older workers there was a more negative relationship that resulted to unintentional discrimination (Shultz & Wang, 2011). For this reason, I believe that older workers face lots of discrimination. However, do you think it is intentional or unintentional in nature?

References

Boone-James, J, McKechnie, S, Swanberg, J & Besen, E. (2013). Exploring the workplace impact of intentional/unintentional age discrimination. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 28(7/8), 907-927

Shultz, K.S. & Wang, M. (2011), “Psychological perspectives on the changing nature of retirement”, American Psychologist, 66(3), 170-179.

Post-2 Reply

It is indeed sad that at this day and age women are still perceived as mere properties and objects. Personally, I have witnessed women being harassed without any form of help and while the society seems to believe that there should be equality regardless of gender there is still a long way to go. Berdahl and Moon (2013) particularly notes that women with children suffer the most form of professional consequence discrimination. This is attributed to the stereotypes about women role being that of a caregiver as opposed to breadwinners (Wayne & Cordiero, 2003). In my opinion, efforts should be made to safeguard women at the national governance level. As much as I do not think this can be done sooner, it is still possible in the long run. What do you think?

References

Berdahl, J. L., & Moon, S. H. (2013). Workplace mistreatment of middle class workers based on sex, parenthood, and care giving. Journal of Social Issues, 69(2), 341-366.

Wayne, J. H., & Cordiero, B. L. (2003). Who is a good organizational citizen? Perceptions of male and female employees who use family leave. Sex Roles, 49, 233–241.

Post-3Reply

I believe that the aspect of sex and age discrimination is immoral and unethical at the same time. Research indicates that at least 40% of women in both private and public sector face discrimination each day of their work (Boone-James, McKechnie, Swanberg, & Besen, 2013). In fact, this discrimination is manifested in terms of unequal pay and delegation of duties (Shultz & Wang, 2011). Personally, I feel both men and women can do tasks at equal measure and produce quality results. This mode of discrimination can be done away with when companies make effort to come up with effective policies that protect women on such issues and severe penalties affected whenever such issues arise.

References

Boone-James, J, McKechnie, S, Swanberg, J & Besen, E. (2013). Exploring the workplace impact of intentional/unintentional age discrimination. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 28(7/8), 907-927

Shultz, K.S. & Wang, M. (2011), “Psychological perspectives on the changing nature of retirement”, American Psychologist, 66(3), 170-179.

Post 4- Reply

From my perspective, I think that employees should, at all times, adhere to the strict code of conduct in workplace. In fact, by employees reading and agreeing to adhere to the company’s policies regarding use of work telecommunication equipment should make them liable in case of misuse. Research indicates that most of the employees nowadays spent lots of time in social media platforms despite their understanding of the existing clear guidelines related to this matter (Cox, Goette, & Young, 2015). There should be no excuse for such kind of action and as such should result to warnings. However, in regards to the aspect of employee surveillance; it might not be a good since employers should choose methods that do not infringe on the rights of the employees, which might a possible litigation (Waxman & Barile, 2015). Following this line of reasoning, I believe that the employer is limited in how to conduct surveillance hence he is unfairly positioned to punish rogue employees. What do you think about this? How can they go about this impediment?

References

Cox, S., Goette, T., & Young, D. (2015). Workplace Surveillance and Employee Privacy: Implementing an Effective Computer Use Policy. Communications of the IIMA, 5(2), 6

Waxman, S. S., & Barile, F. G. (2015). “Eye in the Sky»: Employee Surveillance in the Public Sector 1. Alb. L. Rev., 79, 131-297.