Anotated bibliography Essay Example

  • Category:
    Nursing
  • Document type:
    Article
  • Level:
    Undergraduate
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ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 8

Annotated Bibliography

The Roles and Responsibilities of a Professional Nurse in Diverse and Political Healthcare Context.

Annotated Bibliography

Bryant, R., Foley, E., & Percival, E. (2008). The role of RCNA in promoting trans-cultural nursing as a discipline of study, research, practice and management in Australia. Contemporary Nurse, 28(1-2), 3-1.

In this research report, the authors analyze trans-cultural nursing in Australia from the perspective of Royal College of Nursing. They identify the role of the college in promoting the nursing concept in the country through formation of the Trans-cultural Nursing Society, its achievements and involvement of the college leadership, as well as the continued relevance of this nursing practice. The authors used information from materials obtained from RCNA archival collection, as well as other online sources of information. The review established that the college’s role in promoting the tenets of trans-cultural nursing revolves around the formation of the Trans-cultural Nursing Society in 1990(Bryant, Foley, & Percival, 2008). The society established a quarterly newsletter aimed at sharing important cross-cultural information, creation of awareness, and featuring of issues concerning the practice. With the numerous cultures present in the Australian society, and the increasing number of immigrants, trans-cultural nursing as a practice remain an important area in health care professionalism. In conclusion, the college has played an important role in promoting culturally diverse nursing practice in Australia particularly through creation of a society where nurses share information on the various aspects of trans-cultural nursing.

Nannini, A. (2009). The health policy pathfinder: An innovative strategy to explore interest group politics. Journal of Nursing Education, 48(10), 588-591.

This article discusses the Health Policy Pathfinder as one of the ways in which nursing students can understand valued group politics that assist them in identifying its influence on the policy formulation process, ability to evaluate various sources of information among other benefits. The critical review describes the entire health policy pathfinder and its importance. The author uses information from print sources of information as well as online journals to expound on the health policy pathfinder. According to Nannini (2009), phases of the Health Policy Pathfinder include the pre-design, design, execution, and evaluation. The study identified that this approach enables students to understand the use of different evidences in health policy deliberations, and the process of refuting unreliable information sources (Nannini, 2009). In conclusion, this method forms an important teaching strategy in nursing as it cultivates understanding on policy formulation by nursing students as well as creation of an interactive form of learning between instructors and students.

O’Brien, A., Boddy, J., & Hardy, D. (2007). Culturally specific process measures to improve mental health clinical practice: Indigenous focus. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 41, 667-674.

The researchers identified the various factors critical in the effectiveness of mental healthcare services as well as how the process of care delivery may inhibit recovery of the patient with culturally appropriate clinical practices taking a center stage. The authors used information from a national field study entailing administration of professional audit questionnaire, and clinical indicators comprising of patient notes. The results indicated that only 54.4% of the mental health promotion interventions focused on personal issues while results on cultural safety indicated that only 34.4 percent of patients received an opportunity to express their opinions on whether their cultural issues needed to be addressed in the intervention. The findings indicated the factual purpose for about 65.7% of occasions that professionals needed to offer the choice to have their cultural issues addressed during the care delivery process. In this study, culturally sensitive clinical indicators were identified as important quality mechanisms for determining effectiveness of processes in clinical nursing. In conclusion, studies on factors affecting the process of recovery healthcare have may lead to positive changes in patient recovery as well as the intervention outcome.

Amaro, D., Abriam-Yago, K., & Yoder, M. (2006). Perceived barriers for ethnically diverse students in nursing programs. Journal of Nursing Education, 45(7), 247-254.

The authors in this report explored issues that undermine successful nursing training in the minority groups in the society. Notably, the challenges of the souring nursing training costs, the tax revenue reductions for colleges, and the skewed student-teacher ratio, underpinned the prevailing imbalance in ethnic minority nurse to patient ratio. This study examined the perceived barriers that disrupt ethnically diverse students in nursing school from completing their studies as way of evaluating the processes applied by nurse educators in teaching ethnically diverse students. The purpose of the research included search for empirical evidence to enhance the understanding of the plight by determining the perceptions of ethnically diverse nursing student body in order to build up more evidence about perceived educational barriers. The study comprises of a qualitative research in which fresh graduates representing Portuguese, Asian, African-American, and Latino groups were interviewed using open-ended questionnaire. The research identified cultural differences such as assertiveness, communication barriers, and absence of ethnic role models as some of the inhibitors of the ability of ethnically diverse students to complete their education. Other barriers identified included prejudice and discrimination. On the other hand, the students overcame these barriers through peer support, self-motivation, and presence of ethnic nursing student associations. In conclusion, it is imperative that growth of diversity in the U.S. population is inevitable, which connotes the imminent need for ethnically diverse nursing community to tend for the changing American society. Therefore, nursing educators as well as students should have a proper understanding of these barriers and factors that facilitate overcoming such barriers.

Huang, Y., Yates, P., & Prior, D. (2009). Factors influencing oncology nurses’ approaches to accommodating cultural needs in palliative care. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 18, 3421-3429.

The study identifies the various factors leading to the different ways in which nurses respond when required to provide palliative care to people of diverse cultural origins. The researchers used data obtained from Australian oncology nurses through semi-structured interviews, and analyzed it using grounded theory data analysis method. The study isolated factors such as diverse understanding of culture, the nurses’ philosophy of cultural care, previous experiences with different cultures as well as limitations from the organizational ways of handling culture in healthcare. Evaluation of these factors is important in determining the varied abilities of nurses to accommodate different cultural needs arising in their area of practice. Nursing professionals should be able to judge situations or cultural needs appropriately before intervention. The authors demonstrated through this research that previous cross-cultural experiences, the approach the healthcare institution gives the issues of multi-culture highly determines the conduct of the professional nursing professional at the place of work. This qualitative study was significant in that cross-cultural experience, which at times become impediments to service delivery in healthcare facilities, can be adopted as assessment parameters for the professionals’ progress. This is because recognition of the nurse’s zeal to understand and cope with the issue while integrating it into productive service delivery takes personal commitment. In conclusion, this study enables nursing students to understand factors that may limit their ability to accommodate different cultural needs in their field, and work on addressing such limitations for enhanced professionalism. It was imperative that upon investigating the novel development subject for the nursing professionals, the authors suggested further investigation on nursing professionals on variables of cultural competence and experiences with people from different cultures.

McGrath, P., Holewa, H., & McGrath, Z. (2006). Nursing advocacy in an Australian multidisciplinary context: Findings on medico-centrism. Scand Journal of Caring Science, 20, 394-402.

This study shows medico-centrism as the main cause of tension in multi-disciplinary team meetings. The researchers used data obtained from a qualitative study that lasted for twelve months. They gathered data through open-headed interviews administered to multi-disciplinary health professionals as well as some of their patients. The study provides an insight on how the nursing profession interacts with other disciplines in the field of healthcare. The results show that the main role of nurses revolves around language of advocacy while that of doctors mainly involve decision-making. The study further established the importance of collaboration and cooperation of the multi-disciplinary team in healthcare for effective medical interventions. The findings show that the advocacy role of nurses in healthcare services plays an important role in enhancing multi-disciplinary teams in nursing professionalism. The advocacy role of nurses is highly limited by medico-centrism although it leads to improvement of patient-centered healthcare. This study shows that multidisciplinary teams in health care can only be successful with the elimination of medico-centrism and observance of each individual role in the profession. In conclusion, the advocacy role of nurses not only covers the communication between a nurse and the patient but also appropriate communication with other professionals in order to ensure effective and efficient provision of health care services.

References

Amaro, D., Abriam-Yago, K., & Yoder, M. (2006). Perceived barriers for ethnically diverse students in nursing programs. Journal of Nursing Education, 45(7), 247-254.

Bryant, R., Foley, E., & Percival, E. (2008). The role of RCNA in promoting trans-cultural nursing as a discipline of study, research, practice and management in Australia. Contemporary Nurse, 28(1-2), 3-1.

Huang, Y., Yates, P., & Prior, D. (2009). Factors influencing oncology nurses’ approaches to accommodating cultural needs in palliative care. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 18, 3421- 3429.

McGrath, P., Holewa, H., & McGrath, Z. (2006). Nursing advocacy in an Australian multidisciplinary context: Findings on medico-centrism. Scand Journal of Caring Science, 20, 394-402.

Nannini, A. (2009). The health policy pathfinder: An innovative strategy to explore interest group politics. Journal of Nursing Education, 48(10), 588-591.

O’Brien, A., Boddy, J., & Hardy, D. (2007). Culturally specific process measures to improve mental health clinical practice: Indigenous focus. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 41, 667-674.