Annotated Bibliography: Obesity Health Promotional Campaigns Essay Example

Annotated Bibliography: Obesity Health Promotional Campaigns

Obesity is a major problem and it is important to engage the audiences through different media platforms on behavior change. The paper analyses different views on obesity health promotion, and highlights some important variables required to accomplish the health campaigns. The discussion ranges from availability of information/data to ethical factors in developing and implementing effective obesity health promotional campaign.

  1. Ko, G.T., So, W.Y., Chow, C.C., Wong, P.T., Tong, S.D., Hui, S.S., Kwok, R., Chan, A., Chan, C.L. and Chan, J.C., 2010. Risk associations of obesity with sugar-sweetened beverages and lifestyle factors in Chinese: the ‘Better Health for Better Hong Kong’ health promotion campaign. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 64(12), pp. 1386-1392.

Based on available data, excessive consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages increases chances of obesity. However, the authors acknowledge the minimal amount of data in Chinese population and the study conducted aim to analyze the lifestyle factors that contributes obesity in Hong Kong. The researchers collected information from 2295 men and 2334 women with median age of 43 years. The results indicated that men smoked, consumed SSB and drank alcohol more than women. In addition, the men consumed more meat ratio even though men participated in numerous physical activities. The authors conclude that SSB consumption in women and high meat intake, smoking and physical inactivity in men increased the risk of obesity. The significance of the article is highlight causing factors and through understanding the causative agents, it is possible to devise a campaign that targets the common behaviors resulting in the effectiveness of the health promotional campaign.

  1. Puhl, R.M. and Heuer, C.A., 2010. Obesity stigma: important considerations for public health. American Journal of Public Health, (6), pp.1019-1028.

Discrimination and stigma towards obese individuals pose numerous consequences for their physical and psychological health. The authors state that numerous studies have been conducted, and the significance of weight stigma is well known, but public health institutions have continued to ignore the implications. The authors present examples of discrimination and stigmatization including blaming for their weight, which, the stakeholders’ belief, would motivate the obese individuals to adopt healthier behaviors. The authors present numerous examples illustrating the weaknesses of policies and influence in discrimination and stigmatization. The authors conclude by stating that weight stigma is not significant in reducing obesity rather stigmatization and discrimination of obese persons interferes with obesity campaigns, generates health disparities and threatens individual health. The significance of the article is highlighting weight stigma as a public health concern and social justice issue.

  1. Puhl, R., Peterson, J.L. and Luedicke, J., 2013. Fighting obesity or obese persons? Public perceptions of obesity-related health messages. International Journal of Obesity, 37(6), pp.774-782.

The aim of the study is to examine public perceptions of obesity-related health campaign is emphasizing on message perception and the significance of the message as a motivation agent or a stigmatization aspect. 1014 adult respondent views were collected through online platform targeting respondents from Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States. The respondents were required to rate media messages based on their respective views of stigmatization and motivation. The respondents received positive messages involving themes of increased vegetable and fruit consumption. In addition, the respondents rated highly messages that lacked the work ‘obesity’ but focused on messages advocating healthy behavior changes without referring to body weight. The significance of the research is that some messages increase motivation for behavior change while others are less motivational. Drafting messages with the right content and wording is important in determining whether the audiences embrace healthy behavior change.

  1. Malik, V.S., Willett, W.C. and Hu, F.B., 2013. Global obesity: trends, risk factors and policy implications. Nature Reviews Endocrinology, 9(1), pp.13-27.

The authors’ state that the world is changing, and chronic and obesity-related disease are premised on rapid urbanization, economic growth and trade liberalization. These variables continue to change the living environments, lifestyles and diets while nutritional transitions occur in developing countries through consumption of added sugar, refined grains, animal protein and animal fat. The changes coupled with the continuous physical inactivity because lifestyles are driven by technological advancement. Due to changing conditions, the authors state that under nutrition and change in health behavior contributes to health complications including obesity. Understanding complexity and scope of obesity, policies and prevention strategies across different levels are important6. The authors state that different stakeholders should be involved in formulating and implementing measures to address the obesity epidemic.

  1. Carter, S.M., Rychetnik, L., Lloyd, B., Kerridge, I.H., Baur, L., Bauman, A., Hooker, C. and Zask, A., 2011. Evidence, ethics, and values: a framework for health promotion. American Journal of Public Health, 101(3), pp.465-472.

The authors incorporated numerous evidential information in health promotion practice. The authors have proposed a system that incorporates two important components: these components are an ethical system and an evidential system. The authors also state that there are procedures, values and concepts which are crucial in health promotion ethics and evidence that have to be clarified. The authors highlight numerous consequences of developing a media campaign without considering evidence and ethics requirements. The authors conclude by stating that health promotion practitioners and researchers have to develop capacities for ethical and evidential deliberation in fulfilling the requirement of health promotion profession. The article is important because it incorporates aspects of ethics in developing and implementing health campaigns.

  1. Reininger, B.M., Barroso, C.S., Mitchell-Bennett, L., Cantu, E., Fernandez, M.E., Gonzalez, D.A., Chavez, M., Freeberg, D. and McAlister, A., 2010. Process evaluation and participatory methods in an obesity-prevention media campaign for Mexican Americans. Health Promotion Practice, 11(3), pp.347-357.

The authors used community-based participatory research strategies to address obesity and related complications. The strategies were designed and used to evaluate a Spanish-language media campaign that promoted healthful food choices and physical activity among Mexican Americas. The process evaluation was also employed to analyze the focus and content of the media messages. The focus groups assessed the trustworthiness and appeal of the messages. The authors analyzed experts’ contribution, use of television in the morning shows, and utilization of newsletters to inform on obesity problems. The authors concluded that the CBPR is an appropriate strategy because it appeals and credible to the audience. Hence, incorporating the views of different community stakeholders is important in developing the content and campaign.

  1. Wakefield, M.A., Loken, B. and Hornik, R.C., 2010. Use of mass media campaigns to change health behavior. The Lancet, 376(9748), pp. 1261-1271.

The authors state that mass media campaigns are commonly used to expose messages to large populations through the use of common media channels including newspapers, radio, and television. The use of these platforms is passive because it competes with different variables including habit/addiction driven behaviors, powerful social norms and product marketing. The authors employed numbers health risk behaviors in analyzing the mass media outcomes. The authors continue to state the use of mass media may result in positive and negative changes. The authors present numerous strategies employed in drafting messages and determining the appropriate media platform. The importance of the article is seeking the right media channel to engage the audiences on behavior changes towards healthy lifestyles.

References

Carter, S.M., Rychetnik, L., Lloyd, B., Kerridge, I.H., Baur, L., Bauman, A., Hooker, C. and Zask, A., 2011. Evidence, ethics, and values: a framework for health promotion. American Journal of Public Health, 101(3), pp. 465-472.

Ko, G.T., So, W.Y., Chow, C.C., Wong, P.T., Tong, S.D., Hui, S.S., Kwok, R., Chan, A., Chan, C.L. and Chan, J.C., 2010. Risk associations of obesity with sugar-sweetened beverages and lifestyle factors in Chinese: the ‘Better Health for Better Hong Kong’ health promotion campaign. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 64(12), pp. 1386-1392.

Malik, V.S., Willett, W.C. and Hu, F.B., 2013. Global obesity: trends, risk factors and policy implications. Nature Reviews Endocrinology, 9(1), pp.13-27.

Puhl, R., Peterson, J.L. and Luedicke, J., 2013. Fighting obesity or obese persons? Public perceptions of obesity-related health messages. International Journal of Obesity, 37(6), pp.774-782.

Reininger, B.M., Barroso, C.S., Mitchell-Bennett, L., Cantu, E., Fernandez, M.E., Gonzalez, D.A., Chavez, M., Freeberg, D. and McAlister, A., 2010. Process evaluation and participatory methods in an obesity-prevention media campaign for Mexican Americans. Health Promotion Practice, 11(3), pp. 347-357.

Wakefield, M.A., Loken, B. and Hornik, R.C., 2010. Use of mass media campaigns to change health behavior. The Lancet, 376(9748), pp. 1261-1271.