Annotated bibliography Essay Example

  • Category:
    Nursing
  • Document type:
    Research Paper
  • Level:
    Undergraduate
  • Page:
    3
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    1573

The roles and responsibilities of a professional nurse in diverse and political health care context: Annotated bibliography

, 28, 3-11. Contemporary NurseBryant, R.B., Foley, E. R., & Percival, E. C. (2008). The role of RCNA in promoting transcultural nursing as a discipline of study, research, practice and management in Australia.

The authors of the article (present and past directors at the Royal College of Nursing, Australia) provides the history of trans-cultural nursing in Australia from the perspective of the college beginning with its role in forming the Trans-cultural Nursing society in the 1990s. The authors highlighted the achievements of the society and work that is still in progress. They also demonstrate how the leadership at Royal College of Nursing, Australia has been involved in addressing the trans-cultural nursing issues in Australia. The authors believe that trans-cultural nursing is especially important given that Australia is becoming more and more complex society with diverse ethnic groups. Thus, they believe that promotion of trans-cultural nursing by the college is essential as a discipline of study, research, practice and management in Australia. They believe that the college has been instrumental in training and promoting development of trans-cultural nursing in Australia.

Contrary to this argument previous studies have shown that even though Australia is a multicultural society the nursing services in Australia have failed to meet the needs of Australia’s multicultural (Burgess & Purkis, 2010). However, these previous studies are in agreement that educational preparations can help nurses deal with trans-cultural issues by providing them with necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes essential to work with people from diverse cultural backgrounds (Stevenson, Ryan, & Masterson, 2011). This is what is promoted by Royal College of nursing as pointed out by the authors of the article.

, 53, 34-40. International Nursing ReviewChenowethm, L., Jeon, Y.H., Goff, M., & Burke, C. (2006). Cultural competency and nursing care: an Australian perspective.

The authors, mainly professionals in nursing profession, propose a process that can facilitate cultural competence in Australia nursing practice. The authors believe that the diverse cultural background of Australians is impacting significantly on the quality of nursing care in Australia. The authors [provides a fictitious example that is a reflection of Australian nursing practice. The fictitious example provides cultural insensitivity that is prevalent in Australian nursing practice which often results in compromised quality of services received from nurses by health consumers and their families. The authors thus propose that nurses ought to gain the relevant knowledge, skills and attitudes in order to be able to provide care that is in line with the health consumers’ needs and expectations. The authors recommend that nurses need to respect the culture, value systems and ways of being of health consumers in order for them to provide competent nursing services. By doing so, the authors argue that this will help nurses to protect the rights of consumers of health services in all aspects of nursing service delivery. To be competent in the nursing profession, the authors argue that nurses ought to change their tendency to stereotype individuals from certain cultures and at the same time be sensitive to their culturally defined needs. In addition, the authors proposes integration of nurses trained in oversees countries in the Australian nursing profession in order to help in making Australian nursing community to be culturally competent.

In spite this, some authors have observed that most Australian nurse teachers are not well prepared for the multi-cultural challenges they are facing (Burgess & Purkis, 2010). In addition, it has been observed that the nursing curriculum has not been tailored to meet the increasing significance of cultural diversity in Australia. Some authors even argue that the large literature on diversity is not a reflection of the commitment to adoption of a more basic change in the nursing curricula, teaching and learning practices. It has particularly been identified that little attention has focused on how teachers negotiate meaningful social dynamics within multicultural learning contexts (Ansari, Neewbigging, Roth, & Malik, 2009). Many reasons have been cited to have influenced this lack or unwillingness to adopt what is reported in literature into the nursing teaching curricula (Burgess & Purkis, 2010). One of the reasons cited is a wide range of tensions that arise from the lack of a shared philosophical view about curricula (Stevenson, Ryan, & Masterson, 2011). Another reason cited by various studies is the lack of consideration of diversity as a vital issue for both nursing teachers and students. Studies also indicate that many nursing colleges are reluctant to adopt diversity curricula is the limited perceptions of community as a major driver of curricular and the reluctance of teachers and students to resolve the difficult and contentious matters which arise from diversity in the classroom (Ansari, Neewbigging, Roth, & Malik, 2009). Thus even though Chenowethm et al provides a better way for nurses to become culturally competent, the possibility of their proposals being taken into consideration is dim.

, 48 (10), 588-591. Journal of Nursing EducationNannini, A. (2009). The health policy pathfinder: An innovative strategy to explore interest group politics.

The author of the article, PhD holder, believes that for any nursing health policy agenda to be moved a head; there is need for collaboration with other stakeholders in the field which ought to include consumers of the nursing services. The in this article provides an innovative strategy that students can use to understand stakeholders in the nursing profession. The author argues that the strategy that she has provided can assist nursing students to meet four main objectives. First, the author argues that the strategy can enable students to analyse and articulate different policy arguments from different stakeholders. Second, the author believes that the strategy can enable nursing students in the identification of opportunities through which they can collaborate with other stakeholders. According to the author, the strategy that she has outlined can help nursing students in the identification of interest groups that are influential in the policy making process. Finally, the author believes that the strategy can enable nursing students to critically evaluate evidence from a variety of sources ranging from peer reviewed publications to grey literature to internet blogs. In the article, the author has described the health policy pathfinder in which she described the design, execution and evaluation steps in addition to providing a brief description of a student pathfinder. The author believes that his article is instrumental for nursing students to learn how different types of evidence are used in devising policies and their refutation. The author argues that most policies are devised through comprise and not through best practice. Thus, Nannini believes that her article is essential in teaching nursing students since it encourages creative interactions which help in promoting understanding of diverse viewpoints especially when experiential opportunities to encounter policy or other stakeholders are not possible.

Even though Nannini argues that policy making in nursing profession are politically determined rather than following best practice, the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council (ANMC) was established to bring a national approach to the regulation of nursing and midwifery in Australia (Burgess & Purkis, 2010). The council is charged with setting principles that form the basis for developing and evaluating decision making process. The council also provides templates for decision making tools for nurses. Thus, given that the council has a laid down framework that guides decision making process, could nullify Nannini’s argument that policy making in nursing profession are politically influenced rather than following the best practice in nursing field. The framework developed by ANMC promotes diversity, flexibility and responsiveness in workforce and is a reflection of a whole of health workforce perspective (Stevenson, Ryan, & Masterson, 2011). Thus, its is not right for Nannini to argue that policies are based on politics because whatever policy that is devised must put into consideration all the viewpoints of different stakeholders in the nursing field in order for it to up hold the principles spelt in the ANMC framework for devising nursing policies.

In spite this, other authors are in support of Nannini’s argument because they believe that policy making process in the nursing profession involves six stages (Stevenson, Ryan, & Masterson, 2011). These are: identification of the problem and desired outcome, identification and analysis of stakeholders and networks, understanding the contextual environment, understanding the policy, political and decision making process, managing communication and the change process and finally monitoring and evaluating the project. These stages are more of similar to what Nannini has outlined in her article.

Reference

, 17(6), 636-646Health & Social Care in the CommunityAnsari, W., Neewbigging, K., Roth, C., & Malik, F. (2009). The role of advocacy and interpretation services in the delivery of quality healthcare to diverse minority communities in London, United Kingdom.

, 28, 3-11. Contemporary NurseBryant, R.B., Foley, E. R., & Percival, E. C. (2008). The role of RCNA in promoting transcultural nursing as a discipline of study, research, practice and management in Australia.

, 17(4), 97-308Nursing InquiryBurgess, J., & Purkis, M. (2010). The power and politics of collaboration in nurse practitioner role development.

, 53, 34-40. International Nursing ReviewChenowethm, L., Jeon, Y.H., Goff, M., & Burke, C. (2006). Cultural competency and nursing care: an Australian perspective.

, 48 (10), 588-591. Journal of Nursing EducationNannini, A. (2009). The health policy pathfinder: An innovative strategy to explore interest group politics.

, 20(3-4), 537-544Journal of Clinical NursingStevenson, K., Ryan, S., & Masterson, A. (2011). Nurse and allied health professional consultants: perceptions and experiences of the role.

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