Ann Friedberg’s disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati’s Playtime Essay Example

A discussion of the mobilized virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati’s Play Time by Ann Friedberg

Ann Friedberg’s discussion of the mobilized virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati’s Play Time.

I will be discussing the relation of the mobilized and virtual gaze described by Ann Friedberg to the production of Jacques Tati’s Playtime (1967). In the nineteenth century, apparatus of a wide variety extended the visible field and in turn commodity form was gotten from visualized experience. As found in Jacques Tati’s Playtime, Ann Friedberg’s theories on mobilized and virtual gaze played a big part in its production and filming.

The film was mainly about how humans wonder in the baffle, however hopefully, wonder through the streets of sterile architecture and impersonal cities. The film does not consider observation from anyone’s 1particular viewpoint neither the present screen. However, its intelligence’ focal point residing specifically at the back of the camera’s lens. The bigger picture is always shown by Tati in the play and puts our eyes on the continuous activity of searching activity in the foreground, middle distance, half-off-screen and the background.

Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime

There is a description of the debate on whether there was a crisis of confidence perceived by eye against the possibility of the coincident emergence of the visual culture frenzy from increased optical research2. In the Playtime, the situation of a void room and ample space put subjects in a controversial and psychologically restless position. Doubt and self-evaluation were factors since the people present in a single room were minimal, and his sitting position implied it all.

Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime 1

Speculating that photography invention may have resulted in a crisis that brought about the optical research and, on the other hand, optical research obsession in the nineteenth century may have led to photography as a solution to a predetermined crisis. In the Playtime, a man becomes restless after a short time of wait as he sits with the doorman. The architectural design of the hallway visually implies length, and he may have become anxious within a very short time due to this.

Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime 2

Flanerie trope delineates a visual practice mode. Emphasis on fluid subjectivity and mobility alongside converse instrumentalism was the key reliance of Flanerie rather than interpellation and restraint reform.
Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime 3

Foucault’s panoptic power characterization and imaged the panopticon device models scrutiny “disciplines” by Jeremy Bentham (1791). An unseen seer thereby surveys a controlled and confined subject. In this dyad3
, for both positions, a subjective effect is produced by the panopticon: disciple surveillance portrayed by the ‘seen’ and omnipotent voyeurism portrayed by the ‘seer.’
Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime 4

Panopticon, as per Foucault, is an optical and pure architectural system that excluded the use of false reason being that fictitious relation is the mechanical mother of real subjection as per Friedberg. We clearly see the unconscious reaction of surprise by the man in the above picture. The position and activity of the man behind the mirror visually interpreted that of a person outside. Its structure was then sensibly a building machine that established control, however, scope through arrangement spatially, over its inhabitants.

The above photo from the Playtime clearly illustrates imaged scrutiny that the workers in the building were prone to face from external viewers. The primary thoughts of the subjects inside may have been however of disposition and imagined scrutiny from outsiders. Such a subjective situation encourages the indirect sternness and efficient performance of the workers.
Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime 5

In the panopticon prison, the relation of the inmate to jailer was reconstructed into an effective scope relation of domination and power by placing the panoptic subject in a permanent and conscious visibility state, and it described as a spatial reformatory with the architectural ability to correct and change subjectivity. Disposition of power from without made the prisoners objects of imagined scrutiny. Film theories under apparatus relied exclusively on spatial and immobility matrix of the prison. By the reexamination of cinema emergence, the visual culture instrumental source can be traced although different but coincident with the panoptic visual paradigm. In Tati’s Playtime, the office architectural design placed the workers in subjective positions of the critic by their bosses who had an accessible higher position to stand and view the whole lobby from one point. The feeling of paranoia and scrutiny of their activities shows in the screenshot below.

Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime 6

The Panopticon (1791) briefly compared to other two devices; the diorama (1823) and the panorama (1792) which alternatively suggested models for visuality. They were both machines for building with different objectives. The devices produced a temporal and special mobility, and their design purpose was to transport, rather than to confining the spectator-subject. The dioramic and panoramic observer was subject to a deceptive imaginary illusion of mobility in accordance. Evidently, at the situation in Tati’s play, a woman’s attention is diverted to look towards the Eiffel tower’s image as she opens the door.

Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime 7

In the description of the relation of the virtual glaze to the mobilized; William Wordsworth described4 the panorama (1805) (seventh book, lines 244-257). It is identified to be painting, 360-degree cylindrical in nature, and the observer viewed it from the focal point, center. From below, if observed from the center, an illusion of the ground sinking in perspective is experienced.

Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime 8

It’s presented illusion constituted the combination and relation of a scale model and perspective realist techniques of view that in turn brought about the scene of an observer being lit from above while placed in a darkened room center. As told by Olive Cook, Barker’s inspiration worthily compared to the panopticon prison by Bentham.


Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime 9

Such a lighting relation accounts in the above picture from Tati’s Playtime. The subjected appears frightened and nervous.

It was enumerated that the controlled light in the prison, though in an opposite way, served in the creation of the visual illusions experienced in the panorama as it had served Robert as a way to measure and survey wards in the panopticon prison while he was convicted. The panorama provided temporal and spatial mobility but however not in any way did it mobilize the body physically as seen from the picture below from the Playtime.

Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime 10

The Diorama illusion, closely related to the Diaphanorama, which used illuminated translucent watercolors, was based on the manipulation of visual light through a given transparent painting. It was an apparatus pioneered by5 Louis Jacques Mande Daguerre (1822) after inventing a unique viewing device with the capability of expanding the ability of the panorama to transport the observer. The diorama produced illusions that were dependent on artificial light’s effects and a wholesome number of the paintings, but, however, the buildings housing them ended up in flames. Remarks from Benjamin on his historical coincidence stated that from the ashes of the diorama, emerged photography.

Modernity directly influenced the day today increased the desire to establish and maintain gardens and parks as nature in expanding cities is diminishing and destroyed in the Ann Friedberg’s description. In the film, a group of people had an outdoor meeting in the enclosure, although outdoor in the idea, but still did not satisfy the serene nature of a natural garden or park.
Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime 11

The Modernity process gave birth to unprecedented urban mobility by the new means of transport that came to existence that improved urban circulation. However, in the playtime the direction of looking at the world and our relation to it revealed possibilities of a comic ballet that we perform day in day out6.

Ann Friedberg's disscussion of the mobilised and virtual gaze applied to Jacques Tati's Playtime 12

In conclusion, the nineteenth-century, a large number of proto-cinematic devices were able to negotiate temporal and spatial illusions regardless of respective panoptic systems that were under subjective confinement at the time. In the Playtime, illusions were clearly recorded, and the viewer of the film was able to identify varying activities, positions of objects and body language from observation. A variety of defined apparatus negotiated original illusions of temporal and spatial mobility after ramming Flannery’s pleasure into a commodity form. From the information speculated, traces of subjective shifts caused by apparatuses that may, however, separate the initial experience and the primary referent and locate the observer’s perception of the body. Ann Friedberg’s model of mobility and virtual gaze is into practically reasonable identity in the Jacques Playtime, and one can identify the appropriate interpretation of visual stimulus and the world surrounding us.

References

Playtime Movie Review & Film Summary, (1967) |Roger Ebert|. http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-playtime-1967|

Friedberg, Anne. The mobilized and virtual gaze in modernity: Flâneur/flâneuse. na, 1998.

1 Playtime Movie Review & Film Summary, (1967) |Roger Ebert|. http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-playtime-1967|

2 Playtime Movie Review & Film Summary, (1967) |Roger Ebert|. http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-playtime-1967|

3 Playtime Movie Review & Film Summary, (1967) |Roger Ebert|. http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-playtime-1967|

4
Friedberg, Anne. The mobilized and virtual gaze in modernity: Flâneur/flâneuse. na, 1998.

5
Friedberg, Anne. The mobilized and virtual gaze in modernity: Flâneur/flâneuse. na, 1998.

6
Friedberg, Anne. The mobilized and virtual gaze in modernity: Flâneur/flâneuse. na, 1998.