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  • A person may want other people to think highly of himself or think worse of him. Towards this end the author strives to inform the readers that it is in their power to create the kind of response they may want to have from other people whether negative or positive and thus the level of interaction with other people is dependent upon the person himself. The article is therefore educative, informative and it sustains the character of individuals.

A person may want other people to think highly of himself or think worse of him. Towards this end the author strives to inform the readers that it is in their power to create the kind of response they may want to have from other people whether negative or positive and thus the level of interaction with other people is dependent upon the person himself. The article is therefore educative, informative and it sustains the character of individuals. Essay Example

  • Category:
    Sociology
  • Document type:
    Essay
  • Level:
    Undergraduate
  • Page:
    1
  • Words:
    518

The article under review is titled “The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life” which is authored by Erving Goffman. One of the main ideas proposed or outlined by the author in this article include how other people perceive a person when he/she enters into their realm. The author reveals that people are curios and will always seek information about a new person that enters into their realm. The kind of information that people are likely to seek include conception of self, socio-economic status, competence, attitude towards other people and the level of trustworthiness of the person.

This kind of information is important and helpful because it defines a person and helps other people to know what they might expect from him/her and what they might also offer to the new person around them. The other idea proposed or outlined by the author is that people seek different avenues for sourcing information about a person. One of these avenues include finding clues about a person’s appearance and conduct and applying their prior experiences with people with similar appearance and conduct to determine the kind of a person they are dealing with.

The author avenue is through the words spoken by the person under investigation as well as documentary proof of the person. The other idea presented by the author in this article is that every individual strives to control his/her first impression and motives when he/she appears before other people because people are likely to judge a person by the impression a new person leaves when he/she first appears before the people. For example, a teacher who enters into a new class must show that he is the boss and that everybody else must follow or obey his regulations or rules. This is possible if the teacher starts on a tough note. Hence, the author reiterates that the first impression is vital because it crates the boundary of relationships such as boss/servants or leader/followers.

From the above points it is evident that the author uses the occurrences in everyday life to educate and inform the readers about several issues that must be taken into consideration such as the need for confidence when approaching a group of people, the need to maintain a positive impression during the first encounter with a group of people and the need to take control of the people without letting them take an upper hand in one’s life. It is also evident that the author provides clear information about what a person should expect when he first appears before people.

A person may want other people to think highly of himself or think worse of him. Towards this end the author strives to inform the readers that it is in their power to create the kind of response they may want to have from other people whether negative or positive and thus the level of interaction with other people is dependent upon the person himself. The article is therefore educative, informative and it sustains the character of individuals.

Reference

Erving, G. (1959).The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, New York: Anchor Books. pp 1-16.